The principal scientific journal for the profession in New Zealand

Vol 136 No 1568: 20 January 2023

Public health interventions:
the elephant in the room of the health system crisis

ARTICLE
Vol 136 No 1568: 20 January 2023

An investigation into the digitalisation of New Zealand general practice services during COVID-19 | OPEN ACCESS

On Saturday 21 March 2020, in response to the COVID-19 pandemic in New Zealand and restrictions announced by the New Zealand Government, the Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners (RNZCGP) requested all GP medical centres in the country immediately adopt virtual triage for all patient contacts and aim to provide 70% of consultations by virtual means, commencing Monday 23 March 2020.

ARTICLE
Vol 136 No 1568: 20 January 2023

HIV in women in Aotearoa New Zealand: 25 years of surveillance data

Aotearoa New Zealand is a low HIV prevalence country, with the epidemic largely concentrated in GBM. Women in low-prevalence countries are often perceived as being at low risk for HIV infection by both themselves and medical professionals, which results in less testing, late diagnosis and barriers to treatment and support services.

ARTICLE
Vol 136 No 1568: 20 January 2023

A national audit of performance standards for blood cultures in Aotearoa New Zealand: opportunities for improvement

Blood cultures (BC) are among the most important samples processed in the clinical microbiology laboratory. They remain the gold standard investigation for bloodstream infections, and an essential diagnostic tool for severe infections such as infective endocarditis, bone and joint infections and meningitis.

ARTICLE
Vol 136 No 1568: 20 January 2023

Time for another review: following implementation of a new service model for Auckland Sexual Health service there has been an increase in referrals, case complexity and clinical workload but regional inequities in access remain

The Auckland Sexual Health Service (ASHS) is New Zealand’s largest sexual health service, and prior to the establishment of Te Whatu Ora – Health New Zealand it was contracted to provide primary- and secondary-level specialist sexual health care to three regional district health boards (DHBs): Auckland, Counties Manukau and Waitematā. Auckland has a large, culturally diverse population of around 1.7 million people, which is younger on average than the rest of New Zealand.

ARTICLE
Vol 136 No 1568: 20 January 2023

The impact of pain on function after spinal cord injury

In New Zealand, the most recent figures for the mean annual incidence of traumatic spinal cord injuries (TSCI) over a 10-year period has been found to be 22 per million people. This has decreased from the previously estimated rate of 49 per million from 1998; however, it is difficult to gauge where this new estimate lies in the global context, given the wide variability of figures.

ARTICLE
Vol 136 No 1568: 20 January 2023

The economic cost of Indigenous child health inequities in Aotearoa New Zealand—an updated analysis for 2003–2014

Health inequities by ethnicity are unjust, preventable and amenable to intervention. Indigenous peoples, where measured, are often the most marginalised. In Aotearoa New Zealand, Māori have a life expectancy 7.5 years fewer than non-Māori, and experience higher rates of unmet health need and disease-specific mortality rates.

ARTICLE
Vol 136 No 1568: 20 January 2023

Use of healthcare resources and family planning methods 12 months after birth in women of South Auckland: The Healthy Mums and Babies (HUMBA) randomised trial

More than 7,000 babies are birthed in the Te Whatu Ora CM Health district each year and the perinatal mortality is higher than elsewhere in New Zealand. In this community, postnatal access to and engagement with maternal and child health services is important to ensure the ongoing health and wellbeing of mothers and babies.

ARTICLE
Vol 135 No 1567: 16 December 2022

Mental health inequities for Māori youth: a population-level study of mental health service data | OPEN ACCESS

Rangatahi Māori—Māori youth—experience higher rates of mental health distress and addictions compared to young Pākehā—New Zealanders of European descent. There are growing numbers of rangatahi Māori who report depressive symptoms (28% in 2019 vs 14% in 2012). Māori are more likely to be hospitalised for intentional self-harm and more likely to use substances than non-Māori.

ARTICLE
Vol 135 No 1567: 16 December 2022

We still don’t count: the under-counting and under-representation of Māori in health and disability sector data | OPEN ACCESS

Longstanding and significant inequities exist between Māori and non-Māori across most health indicators including life expectancy, health determinants, health outcomes and healthcare.

ARTICLE
Vol 135 No 1567: 16 December 2022

Documented incontinence after stroke: a secondary analysis of a cohort study. Reducing Ethnic and Geographic Inequities to Optimise New Zealand Stroke Care (REGIONS Care)

Urinary incontinence after stroke may be caused by the direct effects of the cerebral lesion on neurological bladder control physiology, but may also be caused by motor (mobility and dexterity), cognitive (apraxia and agnosia), visual, and language effects of the stroke that adversely affect toileting.