The principal scientific journal for the profession in New Zealand

Issue: Vol 135 No 1557: 1 July 2022

Time for Rangatiratanga

ARTICLE
Vol 135 No 1557: 1 July 2022

Thunderstorm asthma: a review, risks for Aotearoa New Zealand, and health emergency management considerations | OPEN ACCESS

Until recently, thunderstorm asthma (TA) was thought to be a relatively rare phenomenon, but recent events have resulted in it being labelled as a growing threat to public health.

ARTICLE
Vol 135 No 1557: 1 July 2022

Medical students’ experience of studying while working part-time and the effects of COVID-19 | OPEN ACCESS

Worldwide, cost of living and accrued debt causes stress for medical students. In addition to having one of the longest periods of study and paying fees twice that of many of their student counterparts, tuition fees for medical students are large and increasing.

ARTICLE
Vol 135 No 1557: 1 July 2022

Contemporary management of isolated free fluid on computed tomography scan in blunt abdominal trauma—experience from a Level 1 trauma centre in New Zealand

Although computed tomography (CT) is the gold standard for the assessment of haemodynamically stable BAT patients, the sensitivity of CT in detecting HVI, as well as mesenteric injuries is less than ideal.

ARTICLE
Vol 135 No 1557: 1 July 2022

Screening of diabetes in pregnancy in New Zealand: translation of national guidelines into practice

The prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and pre-existing diabetes is increasing in Australia and Aotearoa New Zealand. Indigenous populations in both countries are disproportionately overrepresented among women with diabetes in pregnancy, including Māori (5.7% cf. 2.5% NZ European women) and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders (pooled prevalence odds ratios of Indigenous cf. non-Indigenous women for pre-existing diabetes were 3.63 and 1.42 for GDM).

ARTICLE
Vol 135 No 1557: 1 July 2022

Evaluation of community-based CT abdomen for acute abdominal pain during COVID-19 | OPEN ACCESS

Acute abdominal pain is common, accounting for 5–10% of emergency department presentations and with many potential causes ranging from benign to life-threatening. It is important to identify diagnoses quickly and accurately in order to start appropriate treatment, and to ensure optimal outcomes for patients.

ARTICLE
Vol 135 No 1556: 10 June 2022

Barriers to optimal stroke service care and solutions: a qualitative study engaging people with stroke and their whānau | OPEN ACCESS

In Aotearoa, inequities in access to hospital-based stroke care occur by ethnicity and geography. Our recent research shows that patients presenting to non-urban hospitals and Māori experience major access barriers and worst patient outcomes.

ARTICLE
Vol 135 No 1556: 10 June 2022

Early diagnosis of surgically curable lung cancer is commonly serendipitous

Most patients with lung cancer present with advanced disease and are offered palliative treatment. Approximately 20% of New Zealand patients with newly diagnosed lung cancer are treated surgically.

ARTICLE
Vol 135 No 1556: 10 June 2022

Delayed diagnosis of HIV infection in women in the Auckland and Northland regions

Anti-retroviral therapy (ART) has dramatically improved the life expectancy for people with HIV (PWH). The early diagnosis of HIV infection and subsequent early initiation of ART is associated with significant health benefits and the prevention of HIV transmission.

ARTICLE
Vol 135 No 1556: 10 June 2022

Hospital based specialists’ perspectives of teleconsultation use during the COVID-19 pandemic | OPEN ACCESS

There have been studies investigating the role of teleconsultation during the COVID-19 pandemic. Among strategies that reduce infection transmission including wearing face masks, sneezing/coughing into elbow and hand hygiene, researchers have reported teleconsultation to be an effective way of minimising virus transmission via avoiding person-to-person contact while still providing care to patients.

ARTICLE
Vol 135 No 1556: 10 June 2022

Expansion and consolidation of fracture liaison service in New Zealand public healthcare setting – Waitematā District Health Board Experience

The fracture liaison service (FLS) is a comprehensive secondary fracture prevention programme that has been adopted and implemented internationally, where fragility fracture patients are systematically identified, assessed and managed with the intention of minimising the risk of future fractures. FLSs have been shown to be cost-effective, and FLSs around the globe are supported and evaluated by the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) under their Capture the Fracture® (CTF) initiative on the basis of 13 key performance indicators.