The principal scientific journal for the profession in New Zealand

Issue: Vol 135 No 1555: 20 May 2022

From here to where:
the continued metamorphosis of the NZMJ

ARTICLE
Vol 135 No 1555: 20 May 2022

Determinants of exclusive breastfeeding for wāhine Māori

Māori mothers have the right to breastfeed their infants. This is recognised in the United Nations (UN) Convention on the Rights of the Child, and the right to traditional practices in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the Treaty of Waitangi. For Māori, tamariki (children) are taonga (treasured), and breastfeeding is tika tūāpapa (a fundamental right). Within Te Ao Māori (Māori worldview), breastfeeding is a fundamental aspect of tikanga Māori (Māori cultural traditions/practices) that needs to be protected and promoted.

ARTICLE
Vol 135 No 1555: 20 May 2022

Cholesterol treatment in patients with acute coronary syndromes: does stating a target improve management?

Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of death in New Zealand, responsible for almost one in three deaths, with ischaemic heart disease alone causing approximately 4,800 deaths a year.

ARTICLE
Vol 135 No 1555: 20 May 2022

Describing the experience of Indigenous peoples with prenatal alcohol exposure and FASD: a global review of the literature to inform a Kaupapa Māori study into the experiences of Māori with FASD

Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is one of the key causes of developmental disability, and is characterised by severe neurological impairments that significantly impact general health and wellbeing.

ARTICLE
Vol 135 No 1555: 20 May 2022

The effect of rurality and ethnicity in patients with acute cholecystitis in Northland, New Zealand

Acute cholecystitis is the most common emergency consequence of gallstones and is a common reason for emergency admission in general surgery internationally and in New Zealand.

ARTICLE
Vol 135 No 1555: 20 May 2022

Spontaneous coronary artery dissection: insights from computed tomography coronary angiography follow-up

Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is a separation of the coronary arterial wall that is not associated with trauma or iatrogenic causes. It is an underdiagnosed cause of acute myocardial infarction commonly affecting young to middle aged women, often without classic cardiovascular risk factors.

ARTICLE
Vol 135 No 1555: 20 May 2022

Ethnic disparity in clozapine dosing and cardiotoxicity in New Zealand

The reported incidence of these cardiotoxicities is higher in Australia and New Zealand than in other countries. Three independent studies of Australian populations have reported treatment-limiting or fatal cardiotoxicities in 2.4–8.5% of clozapine patients, and our group has recently demonstrated incidences of clozapine-induced myocarditis and cardiomyopathy in the Auckland District Health Board (ADHB) of 3.8% and 1.3%, respectively. During that analysis it was noted that, although the numbers were small, patients of Māori descent appeared to be overrepresented in the myocarditis cases.

ARTICLE
Vol 135 No 1555: 20 May 2022

Ethnic differences in those presenting for outpatient management of venous leg ulcers

Previous reviews by the Capital & Coast District Health Board District Nursing Service of venous leg ulcers have observed that Māori and Pasifika patients appear younger than those of other ethnicities. There are few published prevalence studies of VLU in New Zealand, and there are no published data from New Zealand on differences according to ethnicity.

ARTICLE
Vol 135 No 1555: 20 May 2022

Adherence to a national consensus statement on informed consent: medical students’ experience of obtaining informed consent from patients for sensitive examinations

One of the challenges specific to teaching and learning sensitive examinations involves the conflict between ethical and educational needs. Balancing the educational needs of students to learn sensitive examinations on real patients and the vulnerability of these patients raises an ethical dilemma.

ARTICLE
Vol 135 No 1554: 6 May 2022

Effectiveness of a preschool asthma education programme, compared to usual care, on the frequency of acute asthma events: a community-based cluster randomised trial

In 2001 and 2003, the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Children (ISAAC) found that young children in New Zealand had some of the world’s highest prevalence of asthma symptoms, with reported asthma in 30% of children aged 6–7 years and current wheeze in 22%.

ARTICLE
Vol 135 No 1554: 6 May 2022

Lockdown Level 4 V2.0: different trauma patterns in Auckland in 2021? | OPEN ACCESS

A decline in trauma admissions during the 2020 lockdown has been reported in several studies in New Zealand and internationally.