The principal scientific journal for the profession in New Zealand

Issue: Vol 135 No 1560: 19 August 2022

Unmet  healthcare need and the significance of charity hospitals
in Aotearoa New Zealand

ARTICLE
Vol 135 No 1560: 19 August 2022

Trauma teams in Aotearoa New Zealand—a national survey

Within New Zealand, there are three tiers of trauma provision, tertiary trauma centres, regional trauma hospitals and smaller rural hospitals, which would often be bypassed in the incidence of major trauma.

ARTICLE
Vol 135 No 1560: 19 August 2022

2021 Assessment of New Zealand district health boards’ institutional healthy food and drink policies: the HealthY Policy Evaluation (HYPE) study

An institutional nutrition policy can create more accessible and affordable healthy food and drinks, thereby positively influencing the dietary intake and preferences of staff and visitors, and ultimately decreasing nutrition-related chronic diseases.

ARTICLE
Vol 135 No 1560: 19 August 2022

Paediatric forearm fractures manipulated in the emergency department: incidence and risk factors for re-manipulation under general anaesthesia

Forearm fractures are among the most common injuries in children, accounting for 45% of all childhood fractures and 62% of upper limb fractures. Treatment upon presentation to the emergency department (ED) routinely involves the use of procedural sedation, closed reduction, and casting. Subsequent re-manipulation under general anaesthetic (GA) is at times required when the initial reduction is inadequate.

ARTICLE
Vol 135 No 1560: 19 August 2022

Cruise ship patient presentation, admission, and intervention rates to the emergency department

New Zealand welcomes 322,000 tourists and 93,000 crew members annually from cruise ships. Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, cruise ship numbers were rising yearly and contributing nearly $600 million to the New Zealand economy annually. Inevitably, some of these visitors require medical care for minor or major ailments. Modern cruise ships often have a medical team on board and varying access to investigations and treatment.

ARTICLE
Vol 135 No 1560: 19 August 2022

Psychiatric hospitalisation before and after commencing long-acting injectable antipsychotic medication: a mirror-image study

Administration of antipsychotic medication in long-acting injectable (LAI) slow release formulations (also called depot antipsychotics) allows doses to be administered in the form of an intramuscular injection every two to four weeks instead of daily oral dosing, ensuring consistent medication delivery and more accurate monitoring of treatment adherence.

ARTICLE
Vol 135 No 1560: 19 August 2022

Surgical smoke: how an issue in healthcare fits a planetary health framework

Exposure to surgical smoke has been linked to acute adverse health effects in healthcare workers including headaches, nausea, cough, and irritation of the eye, nose and throat.

ARTICLE
Vol 135 No 1560: 19 August 2022

High prevalence of scabies in Auckland pre-schools

Recent evidence indicates that scabies may play a more important role in the aetiology of various important diseases of childhood than has been appreciated. One study links scabies infestation with bacterial skin infection, particularly cellulitis and abscess. Scabies has also been implicated in the causation of kidney disease through post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis, and mounting evidence suggests a link with acute rheumatic fever.

ARTICLE
Vol 135 No 1559: 5 August 2022

Children’s perspectives on the wicked problem of child poverty in Aotearoa New Zealand: a wearable camera study

Poverty is a significant health and equity issue in Aotearoa New Zealand. Like many developed countries, poverty rates in Aotearoa New Zealand have been defined as the percentage of households that have disposable income less than 50% of the national median after housing costs.

ARTICLE
Vol 135 No 1559: 5 August 2022

Utility of data linkage for orthopaedic service planning in the paediatric population with cerebral palsy at Starship Children’s Hospital

Patients with CP have ongoing activity limitations and require multiple clinical services over a lifetime, particularly during childhood and adolescence. Information regarding the types and frequency of procedures performed in these children and knowledge of their demographic and clinical profiles would be helpful for service planning, including theatre space and rehabilitation needs, and ensuring consistency of health service delivery and outcomes.

ARTICLE
Vol 135 No 1559: 5 August 2022

Smokefree and vapefree streets: high levels of support from tourists, residents and businesses, implications for tourist-destination communities in New Zealand

Tobacco smoking remains a major cause of death and disability around the world, as well as a major contributor to health inequities. Many countries have progressively implemented strong tobacco control policies and legislation to protect present and future generations from the considerable health, economic, social, and environmental impacts of tobacco.