ARTICLE
Vol 134 No 1546: 26 November 2021

Rates of Māori women receiving surgical treatment for urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse in Southern District Health Board

Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and urinary incontinence (UI) are common conditions that affect women of all ages. The aim of this study was to formally document the rate of access to these surgical procedures for Māori and non-Māori women in the area served by Southern District Health Board (SDHB).

ARTICLE
Vol 134 No 1546: 26 November 2021

Frailty prevalence in Aotearoa New Zealand haemodialysis patients and its association with hospitalisations

Frailty is a syndrome of reduced physiological reserve that increases the risk of adverse health outcomes, such as hospitalisation, increasing dependency, residential care placement and death.

ARTICLE
Vol 134 No 1546: 26 November 2021

How electronically available referral guidelines for primary medical practitioners can improve the timeliness of orchidopexy

When UDT is suspected or confirmed, affected children should be referred to a paediatric surgeon for orchidopexy. Recent studies suggest that orchidopexy by one year provides the best chance of preserving fertility and reducing later development of malignancy.

ARTICLE
Vol 134 No 1546: 26 November 2021

Setting up the Prostate Cancer Outcomes Registry of New Zealand: reflecting and influencing clinical practice

In New Zealand, prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men, with over 3,500 registrations and more than 600 deaths each year.

ARTICLE
Vol 134 No 1546: 26 November 2021

Cancellation of elective orthopaedic procedures is not a benign practice and is often preventable

Osteoarthritis is the commonest form of arthritis. It causes debilitating pain, impairment of function, significant physical disability and consequences to mental health.

ARTICLE
Vol 134 No 1546: 26 November 2021

Access to primary care services using public transport in Ōtautahi Christchurch

In Aotearoa, there is long-standing evidence of enduring health inequities related to socioeconomic status and ethnicity. Access to healthcare is a social determinant of heath, and differences in the availability and attendance at healthcare appointments contribute to inequitable health outcomes.

ARTICLE
Vol 134 No 1546: 26 November 2021

Barriers and facilitators for Māori in accessing hospital services in Aotearoa New Zealand

Māori health inequities result from systematic failures in the provision of healthcare by the public health system and historical structural failures that have led to the inequitable distribution of the social determinants of wellbeing for Māori compared to non-Māori.

ARTICLE
Vol 134 No 1546: 26 November 2021

Sensitivity and potential utility of SARS-CoV-2 rapid antigen and nucleic acid amplification tests in the context of an elimination approach | OPEN ACCESS

Typically, high-volume NAAT testing is performed in batches and results may take several hours. However, a rapid turnaround time of a test, from arrival in the laboratory to provision of results, is critical to the success of public health interventions, as well as for individual patient management.

ARTICLE
Vol 134 No 1546: 26 November 2021

Navigating the health system during COVID-19: primary care perspectives on delayed patient care | OPEN ACCESS

In response to level 4 “lockdown” from 25 March 2020, all areas of the health sector made changes to prepare for a potential influx of unwell COVID-19 patients, as had been seen overseas.

ARTICLE
Vol 134 No 1545: 12 November 2021

Quality of life after oesophageal stenting in patients with palliative oesophageal cancer

Oesophageal carcinoma remains a leading cause of cancer death worldwide, with over 500,000 cases diagnosed in 2018.