Issue

Vol 135 No 1554: 6 May 2022

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Issue Summary

Article
SUMMARY

Effectiveness of a preschool asthma education programme, compared to usual care, on the frequency of acute asthma events: a community-based cluster randomised trial

The ‘Space to Breathe’ asthma study aimed to find out whether better communication between whānau/caregivers, doctors, nurses, and preschool teachers about dealing with asthma, can improve the health of preschoolers with asthma or at high risk of asthma. The study ran in the Auckland region and 675 preschool children took part. The study was a randomised trial, which meant that half the preschoolers received extra support and information on asthma management with the ‘Space to Breathe’ programme, and half were in the ‘usual care’ group. The study found the ‘Space to Breathe’ programme: • Helped preschool teachers learn more about asthma and feel more confident in supporting children with asthma. • Supported children with asthma or at high risk of asthma to use their asthma preventers more often, and have less wheezing and coughing, both during the day and at night. Even though the children in the ‘Space to Breathe’ group had good medicine use and better control of their asthma during the 12 months of the study, children still attended the doctor or emergency department for asthma as much as those children in the ‘usual care’ group.

Article
SUMMARY

Effectiveness of a preschool asthma education programme, compared to usual care, on the frequency of acute asthma events: a community-based cluster randomised trial

The ‘Space to Breathe’ asthma study aimed to find out whether better communication between whānau/caregivers, doctors, nurses, and preschool teachers about dealing with asthma, can improve the health of preschoolers with asthma or at high risk of asthma. The study ran in the Auckland region and 675 preschool children took part. The study was a randomised trial, which meant that half the preschoolers received extra support and information on asthma management with the ‘Space to Breathe’ programme, and half were in the ‘usual care’ group. The study found the ‘Space to Breathe’ programme: • Helped preschool teachers learn more about asthma and feel more confident in supporting children with asthma. • Supported children with asthma or at high risk of asthma to use their asthma preventers more often, and have less wheezing and coughing, both during the day and at night. Even though the children in the ‘Space to Breathe’ group had good medicine use and better control of their asthma during the 12 months of the study, children still attended the doctor or emergency department for asthma as much as those children in the ‘usual care’ group.