Issue

Vol 135 No 1565: 11 November 2022

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Issue Summary

Article
SUMMARY

Feasibility and acceptability of telehealth and contactless delivery of human papillomavirus (HPV) self-testing for cervical screening with Māori and Pacific women in a COVID-19 outbreak in Aotearoa New Zealand

A small proof-of-concept study was undertaken to determine the feasibility and acceptability of a telehealth offer and contactless delivery of HPV cervical screening self-test during the 2021 COVID-19 Level 4 lockdown in Auckland. One hundred and ninety-seven never-screened, due or overdue Māori and Pacific women enrolled in a local Primary Health Organisation (PHO) were invited to take part. Study invitation, active follow-up, nurse-led discussion, result notification and post-test questionnaire were all delivered through telehealth. Out the 197 invited women, 86 women were successfully contacted, 66 agreed to take part and 61 women returned the samples. Uptake of cervical self-test of all contactable women was 70.9%. Six of the 61 self-tests (9.8%) were positive for Human Papillomavirus (HPV), all for non 16/18 types, and were referred for cytology. Three had negative cytology and 3 with positive cytology results were referred for colposcopy. The current study shows that the offer of HPV self-testing during COVID-19 lockdown was both feasible and highly acceptable for Māori and Pacific women.

Article
SUMMARY

Feasibility and acceptability of telehealth and contactless delivery of human papillomavirus (HPV) self-testing for cervical screening with Māori and Pacific women in a COVID-19 outbreak in Aotearoa New Zealand

A small proof-of-concept study was undertaken to determine the feasibility and acceptability of a telehealth offer and contactless delivery of HPV cervical screening self-test during the 2021 COVID-19 Level 4 lockdown in Auckland. One hundred and ninety-seven never-screened, due or overdue Māori and Pacific women enrolled in a local Primary Health Organisation (PHO) were invited to take part. Study invitation, active follow-up, nurse-led discussion, result notification and post-test questionnaire were all delivered through telehealth. Out the 197 invited women, 86 women were successfully contacted, 66 agreed to take part and 61 women returned the samples. Uptake of cervical self-test of all contactable women was 70.9%. Six of the 61 self-tests (9.8%) were positive for Human Papillomavirus (HPV), all for non 16/18 types, and were referred for cytology. Three had negative cytology and 3 with positive cytology results were referred for colposcopy. The current study shows that the offer of HPV self-testing during COVID-19 lockdown was both feasible and highly acceptable for Māori and Pacific women.