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2013 marks 50 years since the publication of C. McK. Holmes’ practice-changing publication Intravenous Regional Analgesia: A useful method of producing analgesia of the limbs.1

This article led to world-wide use of the technique, first described by August Bier in 1908, of producing regional neural blockade by injection of local anaesthetic into a tourniqueted limb.

The importance of intravenous regional anaesthesia (IVRA, also known as ‘Bier’s block’) rests in its relative simplicity, and safety—especially compared with general anaesthesia.1,2

After reading of Bier’s original report, Dr Holmes undertook preliminary research into the technique in the early 1960s while an Anaesthetic Registrar at Dunedin Hospital. He followed this with further work at Oxford while a Nuffield Dominion Scholar (at the same time that Sir Robert Macintosh, a fellow New Zealander and inventor of the Macintosh laryngoscope, held the inaugural Nuffield professorship).3

Today with a slight change in terminology from the original article, intravenous regional anaesthesia is still widely used and valued for the rapid, safe, and effective anaesthesia it provides.2

fig

Penelope Jeffery
Emergency Physician
Capital Coast District Health Board
Wellington Hospital
Wellington South, New Zealand
penelope.jeffery@ccdhb.org.nz

Acknowledgement: Dr C. McK. Holmes – author of the original research.

References:

1.Holmes, CMcK. Intravenous regional analgesia: a useful method of producing analgesia of the limbs. Lancet 1963;2(7275):245–7.

2.Cousins and Bridenbaugh's Neural Blockade in Clinical Anesthesia and Pain Medicine. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Philadelphia 4th Edition 2009 Per H. Rosenberg Ch 15 Intravenous Regional Neural Blockade p372–381.

3.Personal Communication, C. McK. Holmes, 2013.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

2013 marks 50 years since the publication of C. McK. Holmes’ practice-changing publication Intravenous Regional Analgesia: A useful method of producing analgesia of the limbs.1

This article led to world-wide use of the technique, first described by August Bier in 1908, of producing regional neural blockade by injection of local anaesthetic into a tourniqueted limb.

The importance of intravenous regional anaesthesia (IVRA, also known as ‘Bier’s block’) rests in its relative simplicity, and safety—especially compared with general anaesthesia.1,2

After reading of Bier’s original report, Dr Holmes undertook preliminary research into the technique in the early 1960s while an Anaesthetic Registrar at Dunedin Hospital. He followed this with further work at Oxford while a Nuffield Dominion Scholar (at the same time that Sir Robert Macintosh, a fellow New Zealander and inventor of the Macintosh laryngoscope, held the inaugural Nuffield professorship).3

Today with a slight change in terminology from the original article, intravenous regional anaesthesia is still widely used and valued for the rapid, safe, and effective anaesthesia it provides.2

fig

Penelope Jeffery
Emergency Physician
Capital Coast District Health Board
Wellington Hospital
Wellington South, New Zealand
penelope.jeffery@ccdhb.org.nz

Acknowledgement: Dr C. McK. Holmes – author of the original research.

References:

1.Holmes, CMcK. Intravenous regional analgesia: a useful method of producing analgesia of the limbs. Lancet 1963;2(7275):245–7.

2.Cousins and Bridenbaugh's Neural Blockade in Clinical Anesthesia and Pain Medicine. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Philadelphia 4th Edition 2009 Per H. Rosenberg Ch 15 Intravenous Regional Neural Blockade p372–381.

3.Personal Communication, C. McK. Holmes, 2013.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

2013 marks 50 years since the publication of C. McK. Holmes’ practice-changing publication Intravenous Regional Analgesia: A useful method of producing analgesia of the limbs.1

This article led to world-wide use of the technique, first described by August Bier in 1908, of producing regional neural blockade by injection of local anaesthetic into a tourniqueted limb.

The importance of intravenous regional anaesthesia (IVRA, also known as ‘Bier’s block’) rests in its relative simplicity, and safety—especially compared with general anaesthesia.1,2

After reading of Bier’s original report, Dr Holmes undertook preliminary research into the technique in the early 1960s while an Anaesthetic Registrar at Dunedin Hospital. He followed this with further work at Oxford while a Nuffield Dominion Scholar (at the same time that Sir Robert Macintosh, a fellow New Zealander and inventor of the Macintosh laryngoscope, held the inaugural Nuffield professorship).3

Today with a slight change in terminology from the original article, intravenous regional anaesthesia is still widely used and valued for the rapid, safe, and effective anaesthesia it provides.2

fig

Penelope Jeffery
Emergency Physician
Capital Coast District Health Board
Wellington Hospital
Wellington South, New Zealand
penelope.jeffery@ccdhb.org.nz

Acknowledgement: Dr C. McK. Holmes – author of the original research.

References:

1.Holmes, CMcK. Intravenous regional analgesia: a useful method of producing analgesia of the limbs. Lancet 1963;2(7275):245–7.

2.Cousins and Bridenbaugh's Neural Blockade in Clinical Anesthesia and Pain Medicine. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Philadelphia 4th Edition 2009 Per H. Rosenberg Ch 15 Intravenous Regional Neural Blockade p372–381.

3.Personal Communication, C. McK. Holmes, 2013.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

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