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he Task Manager (TM) system outlined in the article1 reports an efficient system for recording after hours requests and it appears to have been widely accepted by clinical staff. Reference to the Hospital at Night initiative implies that this requires a central coordinator role and a physical control centre. The authors further state, Middlemore [Hospital] has not gone down that route due to the number of staff required for such a role and TM provides visibility of tasks. Since 2007, Christchurch Hospital has incrementally introduced the Hospital at Night model to the entire after-hours period,2 largely through the introduction of a Clinical Team Coordinator (CTC) role. One of the functions of the CTC role is to have a hospital wide view to ensure workload is evenly distributed through CTC coordination of tasks to ensure a timely response to patient care. This coordination does not occur with the CTCs based in a physical control centre. Rather, with the aid of technology, the CTCs play a mobile hands-on clinical support role for both RMOs and nursing staff. Christchurch Hospital is investigating TM as a support communication system for the CTCs, but such a system could never be seen to replace the proven value of the CTC role within our hospital to coordinate workload and foster teamwork. TM requires after-hours House Officers to log on consistently, and manage their own workload, without the coordination that is provided in Christchurch which has nurtured team work and exposed the futility of working in silos that have disproportionate workloads. Yvonne Williams Nurse Coordinator - Projects Department of Nursing, Christchurch Hospital John Morton RMO Medical Advisor RMO Unit, Christchurch Hospital Roxanne McKerras Clinical Team Coordinator Christchurch Hospital

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Yvonne Williams, Nurse Coordinator - Projects, Department of Nursing, Christchurch Hospital, John Morton, RMO Medical Advisor, RMO Unit, Christchurch Hospital, Roxanne McKerras, Clinical Team Coordinator, Christchurch Hospital

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

- Seddon ME, Hay D. Task Manager: an innovative approach to improving hospital communication after hours. N Z Med J. 2010 Oct 15;123(1324):57-66. http://www.nzma.org.nz/journal/123-1324/4393/content.pdf-- Morton J, Williams Y, Philpott M. New Zealands Christchurch Hospital at night: an audit of medical activity from 2230 to 0800 hours. N Z Med J. 2006;119(1231). http://www.nzma.org.nz/journal/119-1231/1916/content.pdf-

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View Article PDF

he Task Manager (TM) system outlined in the article1 reports an efficient system for recording after hours requests and it appears to have been widely accepted by clinical staff. Reference to the Hospital at Night initiative implies that this requires a central coordinator role and a physical control centre. The authors further state, Middlemore [Hospital] has not gone down that route due to the number of staff required for such a role and TM provides visibility of tasks. Since 2007, Christchurch Hospital has incrementally introduced the Hospital at Night model to the entire after-hours period,2 largely through the introduction of a Clinical Team Coordinator (CTC) role. One of the functions of the CTC role is to have a hospital wide view to ensure workload is evenly distributed through CTC coordination of tasks to ensure a timely response to patient care. This coordination does not occur with the CTCs based in a physical control centre. Rather, with the aid of technology, the CTCs play a mobile hands-on clinical support role for both RMOs and nursing staff. Christchurch Hospital is investigating TM as a support communication system for the CTCs, but such a system could never be seen to replace the proven value of the CTC role within our hospital to coordinate workload and foster teamwork. TM requires after-hours House Officers to log on consistently, and manage their own workload, without the coordination that is provided in Christchurch which has nurtured team work and exposed the futility of working in silos that have disproportionate workloads. Yvonne Williams Nurse Coordinator - Projects Department of Nursing, Christchurch Hospital John Morton RMO Medical Advisor RMO Unit, Christchurch Hospital Roxanne McKerras Clinical Team Coordinator Christchurch Hospital

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Yvonne Williams, Nurse Coordinator - Projects, Department of Nursing, Christchurch Hospital, John Morton, RMO Medical Advisor, RMO Unit, Christchurch Hospital, Roxanne McKerras, Clinical Team Coordinator, Christchurch Hospital

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

- Seddon ME, Hay D. Task Manager: an innovative approach to improving hospital communication after hours. N Z Med J. 2010 Oct 15;123(1324):57-66. http://www.nzma.org.nz/journal/123-1324/4393/content.pdf-- Morton J, Williams Y, Philpott M. New Zealands Christchurch Hospital at night: an audit of medical activity from 2230 to 0800 hours. N Z Med J. 2006;119(1231). http://www.nzma.org.nz/journal/119-1231/1916/content.pdf-

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

he Task Manager (TM) system outlined in the article1 reports an efficient system for recording after hours requests and it appears to have been widely accepted by clinical staff. Reference to the Hospital at Night initiative implies that this requires a central coordinator role and a physical control centre. The authors further state, Middlemore [Hospital] has not gone down that route due to the number of staff required for such a role and TM provides visibility of tasks. Since 2007, Christchurch Hospital has incrementally introduced the Hospital at Night model to the entire after-hours period,2 largely through the introduction of a Clinical Team Coordinator (CTC) role. One of the functions of the CTC role is to have a hospital wide view to ensure workload is evenly distributed through CTC coordination of tasks to ensure a timely response to patient care. This coordination does not occur with the CTCs based in a physical control centre. Rather, with the aid of technology, the CTCs play a mobile hands-on clinical support role for both RMOs and nursing staff. Christchurch Hospital is investigating TM as a support communication system for the CTCs, but such a system could never be seen to replace the proven value of the CTC role within our hospital to coordinate workload and foster teamwork. TM requires after-hours House Officers to log on consistently, and manage their own workload, without the coordination that is provided in Christchurch which has nurtured team work and exposed the futility of working in silos that have disproportionate workloads. Yvonne Williams Nurse Coordinator - Projects Department of Nursing, Christchurch Hospital John Morton RMO Medical Advisor RMO Unit, Christchurch Hospital Roxanne McKerras Clinical Team Coordinator Christchurch Hospital

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Yvonne Williams, Nurse Coordinator - Projects, Department of Nursing, Christchurch Hospital, John Morton, RMO Medical Advisor, RMO Unit, Christchurch Hospital, Roxanne McKerras, Clinical Team Coordinator, Christchurch Hospital

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

- Seddon ME, Hay D. Task Manager: an innovative approach to improving hospital communication after hours. N Z Med J. 2010 Oct 15;123(1324):57-66. http://www.nzma.org.nz/journal/123-1324/4393/content.pdf-- Morton J, Williams Y, Philpott M. New Zealands Christchurch Hospital at night: an audit of medical activity from 2230 to 0800 hours. N Z Med J. 2006;119(1231). http://www.nzma.org.nz/journal/119-1231/1916/content.pdf-

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