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It occurred to me that the accompanying X-ray photographs might be of some interest to readers, as they are, so far as I know, the first cases of Albee’s bonegraft operation for tubercular disease of the spine in New Zealand. I have performed it three times in the last few months, and with success each time. Two of the cases were shown before the Canterbury Branch of the B.M.A., and the third is a private case, but equally successful.

Case No. 1 is an antero-posterior view of the lumbar spine and graft. She was only 31 years, and had been incapacitated for 15 months, and could not walk, bend, run, jump, or lift without pain, and had to support herself when sitting with her hands. The graft was practically seven inches long and joined the five lumbar vertebrae together, the disease being limited to the second, third and fourth. The technique used was that of Albee. The second photograph shows the tibia of the same patient and the groove from which the graft was removed. As it was not taken till three months later, the bone has nearly closed in at the middle of the groove left. The functional result is all that could be desired and the patient is apparently cured of her disabilities.

Case 2 was a soldier sent from Featherston camp, and a graft was put in the eighth, ninth and tenth dorsal vertebrae. He would have been able to be up at the end of the sixth week had he not developed appendicitis, which, being operated on, retarded his rising from bed for another week. The cure was also apparently perfect.

The third case was that of a young girl, aged 19, whose sister had died from tubercular spinal disease some years before. I inserted a graft into the tenth, eleventh and twelfth dorsal vertebrae and she left the nursing home in less than seven weeks and went to her home. I have not seen her since, but when she left she was apparently quite well and I have heard that since that “she has never been so well in her life.” I have not got an X-ray photo of her to show as I took her photo antero-posteriorly, and the sternum prevented the graft from showing well, but I hope soon to get a lateral one.

c

L1–L5: Lumbar vertebrae.
R: 12th rib.
X Y Z: Albee bone graft, 7in. long.
c

F: Fibula.
T: Tibia.
X Y Z: Grove left by removal of graft seen in lumbar vertebrae of Case 1, and nearly closed in at Y, as three months have elapsed since removal of graft.
c

A1–A8: Vertebrae.
B1–B9: Ribs.
C: Liver shadow.
D1–D5: Vertebrae spines.
E: Shadow of scapula.
X Y Z: Albee bone graft from tibia, the lower end disappearing at X in liver shadow C.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

It occurred to me that the accompanying X-ray photographs might be of some interest to readers, as they are, so far as I know, the first cases of Albee’s bonegraft operation for tubercular disease of the spine in New Zealand. I have performed it three times in the last few months, and with success each time. Two of the cases were shown before the Canterbury Branch of the B.M.A., and the third is a private case, but equally successful.

Case No. 1 is an antero-posterior view of the lumbar spine and graft. She was only 31 years, and had been incapacitated for 15 months, and could not walk, bend, run, jump, or lift without pain, and had to support herself when sitting with her hands. The graft was practically seven inches long and joined the five lumbar vertebrae together, the disease being limited to the second, third and fourth. The technique used was that of Albee. The second photograph shows the tibia of the same patient and the groove from which the graft was removed. As it was not taken till three months later, the bone has nearly closed in at the middle of the groove left. The functional result is all that could be desired and the patient is apparently cured of her disabilities.

Case 2 was a soldier sent from Featherston camp, and a graft was put in the eighth, ninth and tenth dorsal vertebrae. He would have been able to be up at the end of the sixth week had he not developed appendicitis, which, being operated on, retarded his rising from bed for another week. The cure was also apparently perfect.

The third case was that of a young girl, aged 19, whose sister had died from tubercular spinal disease some years before. I inserted a graft into the tenth, eleventh and twelfth dorsal vertebrae and she left the nursing home in less than seven weeks and went to her home. I have not seen her since, but when she left she was apparently quite well and I have heard that since that “she has never been so well in her life.” I have not got an X-ray photo of her to show as I took her photo antero-posteriorly, and the sternum prevented the graft from showing well, but I hope soon to get a lateral one.

c

L1–L5: Lumbar vertebrae.
R: 12th rib.
X Y Z: Albee bone graft, 7in. long.
c

F: Fibula.
T: Tibia.
X Y Z: Grove left by removal of graft seen in lumbar vertebrae of Case 1, and nearly closed in at Y, as three months have elapsed since removal of graft.
c

A1–A8: Vertebrae.
B1–B9: Ribs.
C: Liver shadow.
D1–D5: Vertebrae spines.
E: Shadow of scapula.
X Y Z: Albee bone graft from tibia, the lower end disappearing at X in liver shadow C.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

It occurred to me that the accompanying X-ray photographs might be of some interest to readers, as they are, so far as I know, the first cases of Albee’s bonegraft operation for tubercular disease of the spine in New Zealand. I have performed it three times in the last few months, and with success each time. Two of the cases were shown before the Canterbury Branch of the B.M.A., and the third is a private case, but equally successful.

Case No. 1 is an antero-posterior view of the lumbar spine and graft. She was only 31 years, and had been incapacitated for 15 months, and could not walk, bend, run, jump, or lift without pain, and had to support herself when sitting with her hands. The graft was practically seven inches long and joined the five lumbar vertebrae together, the disease being limited to the second, third and fourth. The technique used was that of Albee. The second photograph shows the tibia of the same patient and the groove from which the graft was removed. As it was not taken till three months later, the bone has nearly closed in at the middle of the groove left. The functional result is all that could be desired and the patient is apparently cured of her disabilities.

Case 2 was a soldier sent from Featherston camp, and a graft was put in the eighth, ninth and tenth dorsal vertebrae. He would have been able to be up at the end of the sixth week had he not developed appendicitis, which, being operated on, retarded his rising from bed for another week. The cure was also apparently perfect.

The third case was that of a young girl, aged 19, whose sister had died from tubercular spinal disease some years before. I inserted a graft into the tenth, eleventh and twelfth dorsal vertebrae and she left the nursing home in less than seven weeks and went to her home. I have not seen her since, but when she left she was apparently quite well and I have heard that since that “she has never been so well in her life.” I have not got an X-ray photo of her to show as I took her photo antero-posteriorly, and the sternum prevented the graft from showing well, but I hope soon to get a lateral one.

c

L1–L5: Lumbar vertebrae.
R: 12th rib.
X Y Z: Albee bone graft, 7in. long.
c

F: Fibula.
T: Tibia.
X Y Z: Grove left by removal of graft seen in lumbar vertebrae of Case 1, and nearly closed in at Y, as three months have elapsed since removal of graft.
c

A1–A8: Vertebrae.
B1–B9: Ribs.
C: Liver shadow.
D1–D5: Vertebrae spines.
E: Shadow of scapula.
X Y Z: Albee bone graft from tibia, the lower end disappearing at X in liver shadow C.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

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