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Published by World Health Organization (Geneva, Switzerland), 2010. ISBN-13 9789241209496. Contains 199 pages. Price US$30.00Leishmaniasis rarely arises in clinical practice in New Zealand but there is a trickle of refugees from Afghanistan and travellers from South America or the Mediterranean region who present for diagnosis and treatment. Because it seldom seen, it is regarded here as a curiosity for the infectious diseases cognoscenti, but from a global perspective Leishmania occurs among the poorest of the poor and has shown a troublesome ability to spread and cause epidemics.Visceral Leishmaniasis almost disappeared from the Ganges-Brahmaputra basin with the malaria eradication programme of the 1950s but has returned since then, and civil war has led to epidemics in the Sudan causing thousands of deaths.The latter epidemic has spread to Ethiopia and coinfection with HIV has led to progressive spread into other regions.In South America several species have adapted to deforestation by finding new vectors and reservoir hosts leading to increasing numbers of cutaneous and mucocutaneous cases in the region. Because of the persistence of Leshmaniasis, WHO convened an Expert Committee on the Control of Leishmaniases in March 2010, to review our understanding of this disease and point the way forward. This book is the result of these deliberations.The most important conclusion is that control is feasible with our current tools but there is a crucial lack of finding, commitment and collaboration. This is not surprising but a depressingly familiar story, as the basic biology, treatment and control measures have been understood for close to 100 years. Indeed trivalent antimonials were introduced for treatment in 1912.Despite this there have been significant advances made in the last 20 years since WHO last produced a technical report on Leishmania, ranging from new rapid diagnostic tests for visceral leishmaniasis, DNA bases typing systems to new drugs which are expertly and objectively reviewed. As a technical report it is an admirable low cost, practical, how to, strategy document by the world leaders in the field. There are no photographs but some maps of geographic distribution of disease and occasional line drawings are included.This report is essential for anyone interested in international health and valuable for microbiologists and clinicians dealing with clinical disease.Stephen T Chambers Department of Infectious Diseases, Christchurch Hospital Christchurch

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Stephen T Chambers, Department of Infectious Diseases, Christchurch Hospital, Christchurch

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

Published by World Health Organization (Geneva, Switzerland), 2010. ISBN-13 9789241209496. Contains 199 pages. Price US$30.00Leishmaniasis rarely arises in clinical practice in New Zealand but there is a trickle of refugees from Afghanistan and travellers from South America or the Mediterranean region who present for diagnosis and treatment. Because it seldom seen, it is regarded here as a curiosity for the infectious diseases cognoscenti, but from a global perspective Leishmania occurs among the poorest of the poor and has shown a troublesome ability to spread and cause epidemics.Visceral Leishmaniasis almost disappeared from the Ganges-Brahmaputra basin with the malaria eradication programme of the 1950s but has returned since then, and civil war has led to epidemics in the Sudan causing thousands of deaths.The latter epidemic has spread to Ethiopia and coinfection with HIV has led to progressive spread into other regions.In South America several species have adapted to deforestation by finding new vectors and reservoir hosts leading to increasing numbers of cutaneous and mucocutaneous cases in the region. Because of the persistence of Leshmaniasis, WHO convened an Expert Committee on the Control of Leishmaniases in March 2010, to review our understanding of this disease and point the way forward. This book is the result of these deliberations.The most important conclusion is that control is feasible with our current tools but there is a crucial lack of finding, commitment and collaboration. This is not surprising but a depressingly familiar story, as the basic biology, treatment and control measures have been understood for close to 100 years. Indeed trivalent antimonials were introduced for treatment in 1912.Despite this there have been significant advances made in the last 20 years since WHO last produced a technical report on Leishmania, ranging from new rapid diagnostic tests for visceral leishmaniasis, DNA bases typing systems to new drugs which are expertly and objectively reviewed. As a technical report it is an admirable low cost, practical, how to, strategy document by the world leaders in the field. There are no photographs but some maps of geographic distribution of disease and occasional line drawings are included.This report is essential for anyone interested in international health and valuable for microbiologists and clinicians dealing with clinical disease.Stephen T Chambers Department of Infectious Diseases, Christchurch Hospital Christchurch

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Stephen T Chambers, Department of Infectious Diseases, Christchurch Hospital, Christchurch

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

Published by World Health Organization (Geneva, Switzerland), 2010. ISBN-13 9789241209496. Contains 199 pages. Price US$30.00Leishmaniasis rarely arises in clinical practice in New Zealand but there is a trickle of refugees from Afghanistan and travellers from South America or the Mediterranean region who present for diagnosis and treatment. Because it seldom seen, it is regarded here as a curiosity for the infectious diseases cognoscenti, but from a global perspective Leishmania occurs among the poorest of the poor and has shown a troublesome ability to spread and cause epidemics.Visceral Leishmaniasis almost disappeared from the Ganges-Brahmaputra basin with the malaria eradication programme of the 1950s but has returned since then, and civil war has led to epidemics in the Sudan causing thousands of deaths.The latter epidemic has spread to Ethiopia and coinfection with HIV has led to progressive spread into other regions.In South America several species have adapted to deforestation by finding new vectors and reservoir hosts leading to increasing numbers of cutaneous and mucocutaneous cases in the region. Because of the persistence of Leshmaniasis, WHO convened an Expert Committee on the Control of Leishmaniases in March 2010, to review our understanding of this disease and point the way forward. This book is the result of these deliberations.The most important conclusion is that control is feasible with our current tools but there is a crucial lack of finding, commitment and collaboration. This is not surprising but a depressingly familiar story, as the basic biology, treatment and control measures have been understood for close to 100 years. Indeed trivalent antimonials were introduced for treatment in 1912.Despite this there have been significant advances made in the last 20 years since WHO last produced a technical report on Leishmania, ranging from new rapid diagnostic tests for visceral leishmaniasis, DNA bases typing systems to new drugs which are expertly and objectively reviewed. As a technical report it is an admirable low cost, practical, how to, strategy document by the world leaders in the field. There are no photographs but some maps of geographic distribution of disease and occasional line drawings are included.This report is essential for anyone interested in international health and valuable for microbiologists and clinicians dealing with clinical disease.Stephen T Chambers Department of Infectious Diseases, Christchurch Hospital Christchurch

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Stephen T Chambers, Department of Infectious Diseases, Christchurch Hospital, Christchurch

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

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