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Excerpt from Dominion Notes published in NZMJ 1911 May;10(38):35–37.The following is a summary of the main features of the Rev. Edward Walker's statement showing the "drink bill" for 1910. For some years past Mr. Walker has annually calculated and published the Dominion's expenditure on alcoholic liquors.The drink bill of the Dominion for 1910, calculated as usual at per gallon rates on the quantity, which passed through the Customs and excise, amounted to £3,803,438, being an increase on the previous year of £175,310,or £3 13s. 1¼d per head of population, being an increase per head on the previous year of 2s. 0¾d.The bill is like a barometer for showing the current spending powers of the people. Anyone may form his own estimate of what the figures would be if the increase, after passing the Customs and excise, of the quantity of liquor, by methods known to the trade; and the actual cost to the consumers, not at per gallon, but as sold across the bar, could be calculated.Probably five million pounds sterling, and five pounds per head of population, or £25 per household, is less than was really spent on liquor in New Zealand last year. The Customs and excise revenue from it was £799,634.

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Results

Conclusion

Author Information

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Correspondence

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Competing Interests

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Excerpt from Dominion Notes published in NZMJ 1911 May;10(38):35–37.The following is a summary of the main features of the Rev. Edward Walker's statement showing the "drink bill" for 1910. For some years past Mr. Walker has annually calculated and published the Dominion's expenditure on alcoholic liquors.The drink bill of the Dominion for 1910, calculated as usual at per gallon rates on the quantity, which passed through the Customs and excise, amounted to £3,803,438, being an increase on the previous year of £175,310,or £3 13s. 1¼d per head of population, being an increase per head on the previous year of 2s. 0¾d.The bill is like a barometer for showing the current spending powers of the people. Anyone may form his own estimate of what the figures would be if the increase, after passing the Customs and excise, of the quantity of liquor, by methods known to the trade; and the actual cost to the consumers, not at per gallon, but as sold across the bar, could be calculated.Probably five million pounds sterling, and five pounds per head of population, or £25 per household, is less than was really spent on liquor in New Zealand last year. The Customs and excise revenue from it was £799,634.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

Excerpt from Dominion Notes published in NZMJ 1911 May;10(38):35–37.The following is a summary of the main features of the Rev. Edward Walker's statement showing the "drink bill" for 1910. For some years past Mr. Walker has annually calculated and published the Dominion's expenditure on alcoholic liquors.The drink bill of the Dominion for 1910, calculated as usual at per gallon rates on the quantity, which passed through the Customs and excise, amounted to £3,803,438, being an increase on the previous year of £175,310,or £3 13s. 1¼d per head of population, being an increase per head on the previous year of 2s. 0¾d.The bill is like a barometer for showing the current spending powers of the people. Anyone may form his own estimate of what the figures would be if the increase, after passing the Customs and excise, of the quantity of liquor, by methods known to the trade; and the actual cost to the consumers, not at per gallon, but as sold across the bar, could be calculated.Probably five million pounds sterling, and five pounds per head of population, or £25 per household, is less than was really spent on liquor in New Zealand last year. The Customs and excise revenue from it was £799,634.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

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