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Excerpt from Editorial published in NZMJ 1911;10(39):43–51. Continued from part 1 at http://journal.nzma.org.nz/journal/126-1385/5905/Far from the difficulties of the matter ending in in diagnosis, treatment is also a subject of much perplexity. We assume that few members of the profession will rest content at the stage of giving Bismuth and Soda, if this fails, an acid mixture, and as a last resort recommending a long, sea voyage. Certainly bismuth and soda, and the acids are the main medicinal agents in treatment.We have no drug, not even nux vomica, which can stimulate the gastric muscle equal to the action of digitalis on the heart. Massage is useful, not so much for the effect upon the stomach itself, but upon the abdominal walls. As to diet, there is a great diversity of opinion, and no uniform feeding can be recommended. It is a wise proverb that asserts "at the age of forty, a man is either a fool or a physician." In other words, if he has any common-sense, he knows what food agrees with him and also what does not.We believe that seldom in nature one single cause operates alone to produce a final result. In cases of dyspepsia there is a great variety of causes, and of resulting types, and it is not likely that the matter of diagnosis, classification and treatment will ever be simple. The great sheet-anchor of the profession in dealing with the dyspeptic is the exercise of common-sense. One may possess the science of a Harvey, the art of a Sydenham, and the manners of a Chesterfield, and yet fail if lacking in a good store of common-sense.The personality of the doctor is even more important than the medicine chest. For the patient, faith in the pharmacopeia (fides) is not so helpful, by any means, as faith in the doctor himself (fiducia). There is an obvious reason, for the greatest number of eases of functional dypepsia are of nervous origin, and to be explained by that blessed word neurasthenia.This is a dyspeptic age—the stress and strain of life to-day is much too great. One is tempted to be laudator temporis acti. In Rome functional dyspepsia was cured with a feather in the vomitoria, and with it purge in Merrie England, and over-eating was the main cause of the disorder.At the present time, there are many people who are dyspeptic from their mother's womb, both mentally, physically and sometimes morally. Starvation will cure a few, but a tranquil mind and a good meal will cure a legion of those who think that Providence intended that their scanty meals were only sign-posts to indicate that they were to take their medicine either before or after.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

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Excerpt from Editorial published in NZMJ 1911;10(39):43–51. Continued from part 1 at http://journal.nzma.org.nz/journal/126-1385/5905/Far from the difficulties of the matter ending in in diagnosis, treatment is also a subject of much perplexity. We assume that few members of the profession will rest content at the stage of giving Bismuth and Soda, if this fails, an acid mixture, and as a last resort recommending a long, sea voyage. Certainly bismuth and soda, and the acids are the main medicinal agents in treatment.We have no drug, not even nux vomica, which can stimulate the gastric muscle equal to the action of digitalis on the heart. Massage is useful, not so much for the effect upon the stomach itself, but upon the abdominal walls. As to diet, there is a great diversity of opinion, and no uniform feeding can be recommended. It is a wise proverb that asserts "at the age of forty, a man is either a fool or a physician." In other words, if he has any common-sense, he knows what food agrees with him and also what does not.We believe that seldom in nature one single cause operates alone to produce a final result. In cases of dyspepsia there is a great variety of causes, and of resulting types, and it is not likely that the matter of diagnosis, classification and treatment will ever be simple. The great sheet-anchor of the profession in dealing with the dyspeptic is the exercise of common-sense. One may possess the science of a Harvey, the art of a Sydenham, and the manners of a Chesterfield, and yet fail if lacking in a good store of common-sense.The personality of the doctor is even more important than the medicine chest. For the patient, faith in the pharmacopeia (fides) is not so helpful, by any means, as faith in the doctor himself (fiducia). There is an obvious reason, for the greatest number of eases of functional dypepsia are of nervous origin, and to be explained by that blessed word neurasthenia.This is a dyspeptic age—the stress and strain of life to-day is much too great. One is tempted to be laudator temporis acti. In Rome functional dyspepsia was cured with a feather in the vomitoria, and with it purge in Merrie England, and over-eating was the main cause of the disorder.At the present time, there are many people who are dyspeptic from their mother's womb, both mentally, physically and sometimes morally. Starvation will cure a few, but a tranquil mind and a good meal will cure a legion of those who think that Providence intended that their scanty meals were only sign-posts to indicate that they were to take their medicine either before or after.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

Excerpt from Editorial published in NZMJ 1911;10(39):43–51. Continued from part 1 at http://journal.nzma.org.nz/journal/126-1385/5905/Far from the difficulties of the matter ending in in diagnosis, treatment is also a subject of much perplexity. We assume that few members of the profession will rest content at the stage of giving Bismuth and Soda, if this fails, an acid mixture, and as a last resort recommending a long, sea voyage. Certainly bismuth and soda, and the acids are the main medicinal agents in treatment.We have no drug, not even nux vomica, which can stimulate the gastric muscle equal to the action of digitalis on the heart. Massage is useful, not so much for the effect upon the stomach itself, but upon the abdominal walls. As to diet, there is a great diversity of opinion, and no uniform feeding can be recommended. It is a wise proverb that asserts "at the age of forty, a man is either a fool or a physician." In other words, if he has any common-sense, he knows what food agrees with him and also what does not.We believe that seldom in nature one single cause operates alone to produce a final result. In cases of dyspepsia there is a great variety of causes, and of resulting types, and it is not likely that the matter of diagnosis, classification and treatment will ever be simple. The great sheet-anchor of the profession in dealing with the dyspeptic is the exercise of common-sense. One may possess the science of a Harvey, the art of a Sydenham, and the manners of a Chesterfield, and yet fail if lacking in a good store of common-sense.The personality of the doctor is even more important than the medicine chest. For the patient, faith in the pharmacopeia (fides) is not so helpful, by any means, as faith in the doctor himself (fiducia). There is an obvious reason, for the greatest number of eases of functional dypepsia are of nervous origin, and to be explained by that blessed word neurasthenia.This is a dyspeptic age—the stress and strain of life to-day is much too great. One is tempted to be laudator temporis acti. In Rome functional dyspepsia was cured with a feather in the vomitoria, and with it purge in Merrie England, and over-eating was the main cause of the disorder.At the present time, there are many people who are dyspeptic from their mother's womb, both mentally, physically and sometimes morally. Starvation will cure a few, but a tranquil mind and a good meal will cure a legion of those who think that Providence intended that their scanty meals were only sign-posts to indicate that they were to take their medicine either before or after.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

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