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Psoriasis is a common skin condition1 with both genetic and environmental influences. Much is still not known about the epidemiology of psoriasis, especially in New Zealand, as most of the epidemiological studies thus far have been from overseas.In 2005, a New England Journal of Medicine review article on psoriasis suggested that psoriasis has a lower prevalence in indigenous populations, and of particular mention was that there were no cases in the Samoan population. It has also recently been reported that there is a statistically significant difference in psoriasis prevalence between the various ethnic groups in the United States.3We sought to look at rates of psoriasis in a New Zealand context with particular attention to the ethnicity of patients seen in our department. An audit was undertaken looking at the ethnicities of the psoriasis patients that were treated in Auckland District Health Board (ADHB) over the last 5 years (2009–2014).We included psoriasis patients who had severe psoriasis requiring our service as data on these patients was more readily available. Patients who were admitted as inpatients to Auckland City Hospital, or underwent a course of phototherapy at the Greenlane Clinical Centre, from 2009 to 2014 were identified. Their notes were consulted and the ethnicity of each patient was recorded. This audit involved non-identifiable data and therefore ethics approval was not required. Ethnicity Number of patients Percentage of patients New Zealand European Maori Samoan Tongan Nieuan Cook Island Maori Fijian Asian Other 273 52 29 22 4 20 8 93 10 53.42% 10.17% 5.68% 4.31% 0.78% 3.91% 1.57% 18.20% 1.96% TOTAL 511 100.00% In total, 511 psoriasis patients were identified from the ADHB area. Out of these the biggest group were NZ Europeans (53.42%). A substantial minority of patients were Maori and Pacific Islanders (26.42%). As a comparison, the general ADHB population is comprised of 19.1% Maori and Pacific Islanders and 52% NZ Europeans.4 Of note, Samoans represented 5.68% of the total number of psoriasis patients in this audit. So while rates may be lower compared to NZ Europeans, this skin disease is still seen in this ethnic minority.Although we were unable to capture all the psoriasis patients in the ADHB area due to our current data collection system, the audit that we have done suggests that the New Zealand indigenous population of Maori and Pacific Islanders do indeed make up a substantial minority of patients with psoriasis. Further population based studies looking at the true national prevalence of psoriasis patients and their ethnicity in all New Zealand is warranted.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Martin Lee, Dermatology Registrar, Dermatology Department, Auckland Hospital, Auckland; Steven Lamb, Consultant Dermatologist, Dermatology Department, Auckland Hospital, Auckland

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

1.-Parisi R, Symmons DPM, Griffiths CEM, et al.-Global epidemiology of psoriasis: a systematic review of incidence and-prevalence. Journal of Investigative Dermatology. 2013;133:377-385. http://www.nature.com/jid/journal/v133/n2/full/jid2012339a.html2.-Schon MP, Boehncke WH. Psoriasis. N Engl J Med-2005;352:1899-912.-3.-Rachakonda TD, Schupp CW, Armstrong AW.-Psoriasis prevalence among adults in the United States. JAAD. 2013;70:512-516.-4.-Census data, ADHB, 2006.

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

Psoriasis is a common skin condition1 with both genetic and environmental influences. Much is still not known about the epidemiology of psoriasis, especially in New Zealand, as most of the epidemiological studies thus far have been from overseas.In 2005, a New England Journal of Medicine review article on psoriasis suggested that psoriasis has a lower prevalence in indigenous populations, and of particular mention was that there were no cases in the Samoan population. It has also recently been reported that there is a statistically significant difference in psoriasis prevalence between the various ethnic groups in the United States.3We sought to look at rates of psoriasis in a New Zealand context with particular attention to the ethnicity of patients seen in our department. An audit was undertaken looking at the ethnicities of the psoriasis patients that were treated in Auckland District Health Board (ADHB) over the last 5 years (2009–2014).We included psoriasis patients who had severe psoriasis requiring our service as data on these patients was more readily available. Patients who were admitted as inpatients to Auckland City Hospital, or underwent a course of phototherapy at the Greenlane Clinical Centre, from 2009 to 2014 were identified. Their notes were consulted and the ethnicity of each patient was recorded. This audit involved non-identifiable data and therefore ethics approval was not required. Ethnicity Number of patients Percentage of patients New Zealand European Maori Samoan Tongan Nieuan Cook Island Maori Fijian Asian Other 273 52 29 22 4 20 8 93 10 53.42% 10.17% 5.68% 4.31% 0.78% 3.91% 1.57% 18.20% 1.96% TOTAL 511 100.00% In total, 511 psoriasis patients were identified from the ADHB area. Out of these the biggest group were NZ Europeans (53.42%). A substantial minority of patients were Maori and Pacific Islanders (26.42%). As a comparison, the general ADHB population is comprised of 19.1% Maori and Pacific Islanders and 52% NZ Europeans.4 Of note, Samoans represented 5.68% of the total number of psoriasis patients in this audit. So while rates may be lower compared to NZ Europeans, this skin disease is still seen in this ethnic minority.Although we were unable to capture all the psoriasis patients in the ADHB area due to our current data collection system, the audit that we have done suggests that the New Zealand indigenous population of Maori and Pacific Islanders do indeed make up a substantial minority of patients with psoriasis. Further population based studies looking at the true national prevalence of psoriasis patients and their ethnicity in all New Zealand is warranted.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Martin Lee, Dermatology Registrar, Dermatology Department, Auckland Hospital, Auckland; Steven Lamb, Consultant Dermatologist, Dermatology Department, Auckland Hospital, Auckland

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

1.-Parisi R, Symmons DPM, Griffiths CEM, et al.-Global epidemiology of psoriasis: a systematic review of incidence and-prevalence. Journal of Investigative Dermatology. 2013;133:377-385. http://www.nature.com/jid/journal/v133/n2/full/jid2012339a.html2.-Schon MP, Boehncke WH. Psoriasis. N Engl J Med-2005;352:1899-912.-3.-Rachakonda TD, Schupp CW, Armstrong AW.-Psoriasis prevalence among adults in the United States. JAAD. 2013;70:512-516.-4.-Census data, ADHB, 2006.

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

Psoriasis is a common skin condition1 with both genetic and environmental influences. Much is still not known about the epidemiology of psoriasis, especially in New Zealand, as most of the epidemiological studies thus far have been from overseas.In 2005, a New England Journal of Medicine review article on psoriasis suggested that psoriasis has a lower prevalence in indigenous populations, and of particular mention was that there were no cases in the Samoan population. It has also recently been reported that there is a statistically significant difference in psoriasis prevalence between the various ethnic groups in the United States.3We sought to look at rates of psoriasis in a New Zealand context with particular attention to the ethnicity of patients seen in our department. An audit was undertaken looking at the ethnicities of the psoriasis patients that were treated in Auckland District Health Board (ADHB) over the last 5 years (2009–2014).We included psoriasis patients who had severe psoriasis requiring our service as data on these patients was more readily available. Patients who were admitted as inpatients to Auckland City Hospital, or underwent a course of phototherapy at the Greenlane Clinical Centre, from 2009 to 2014 were identified. Their notes were consulted and the ethnicity of each patient was recorded. This audit involved non-identifiable data and therefore ethics approval was not required. Ethnicity Number of patients Percentage of patients New Zealand European Maori Samoan Tongan Nieuan Cook Island Maori Fijian Asian Other 273 52 29 22 4 20 8 93 10 53.42% 10.17% 5.68% 4.31% 0.78% 3.91% 1.57% 18.20% 1.96% TOTAL 511 100.00% In total, 511 psoriasis patients were identified from the ADHB area. Out of these the biggest group were NZ Europeans (53.42%). A substantial minority of patients were Maori and Pacific Islanders (26.42%). As a comparison, the general ADHB population is comprised of 19.1% Maori and Pacific Islanders and 52% NZ Europeans.4 Of note, Samoans represented 5.68% of the total number of psoriasis patients in this audit. So while rates may be lower compared to NZ Europeans, this skin disease is still seen in this ethnic minority.Although we were unable to capture all the psoriasis patients in the ADHB area due to our current data collection system, the audit that we have done suggests that the New Zealand indigenous population of Maori and Pacific Islanders do indeed make up a substantial minority of patients with psoriasis. Further population based studies looking at the true national prevalence of psoriasis patients and their ethnicity in all New Zealand is warranted.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Martin Lee, Dermatology Registrar, Dermatology Department, Auckland Hospital, Auckland; Steven Lamb, Consultant Dermatologist, Dermatology Department, Auckland Hospital, Auckland

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

1.-Parisi R, Symmons DPM, Griffiths CEM, et al.-Global epidemiology of psoriasis: a systematic review of incidence and-prevalence. Journal of Investigative Dermatology. 2013;133:377-385. http://www.nature.com/jid/journal/v133/n2/full/jid2012339a.html2.-Schon MP, Boehncke WH. Psoriasis. N Engl J Med-2005;352:1899-912.-3.-Rachakonda TD, Schupp CW, Armstrong AW.-Psoriasis prevalence among adults in the United States. JAAD. 2013;70:512-516.-4.-Census data, ADHB, 2006.

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

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