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Excerpt published in 1911 August;10(39):52-53. Major F. T. Woodbury, Med. Corps, U.S. Army (New York Med. Jour.; Dec. 3, p. 1105J). The writer believes that iodine is the long-desired ideal antiseptic. It is cheap, easily obtained, portable in small bulk, efficient in high dilution, does not damage tissue, even when its vitality has been reduced by traumatism or infection, and though it has great powers of tissue penetration the writer has not yet seen a case of poisoning even when it is mopped in full strength on the peritoneum and in the parturient uterus. It can be used to disinfect the area of operation without previous preparation; to sterilize instruments, suture material, dressings, and the hands of the surgeon, during the time that the patient is going under the anaesthetic. But the writer prefers to boil his instruments when he can, as the continued use of iodine tarnishes and blunts the cutting edges, though the same in a lesser degree holds for the soda solution. The writer uses iodine entirely to prepare his hands and it rarely causes irritation. It can be removed with boiled or raw starch, ammonia water, aromatic spirit of ammonia, hydrogen peroxide, Fowler's solution, or ether. If long periods of operating are expected, it is well to dip the hands in iodine and immediately decolorize with ammonia; rubber finger cots or rubber gloves; may be slipped on, and then redipped in the iodine. This is merely to protect the operator's hands from being dyed a deep brown, which is almost impossible to get rid of if the tincture is applied everyone or two days. The solution of one teaspoonful of the tincture to the quart of normal saline solution ('007 per cent.) is most efficacious for irrigation in all inflammatory and catarrhal conditions of mucous membrane. It can be used for conjunctivitis with prompt improvement.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

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Excerpt published in 1911 August;10(39):52-53. Major F. T. Woodbury, Med. Corps, U.S. Army (New York Med. Jour.; Dec. 3, p. 1105J). The writer believes that iodine is the long-desired ideal antiseptic. It is cheap, easily obtained, portable in small bulk, efficient in high dilution, does not damage tissue, even when its vitality has been reduced by traumatism or infection, and though it has great powers of tissue penetration the writer has not yet seen a case of poisoning even when it is mopped in full strength on the peritoneum and in the parturient uterus. It can be used to disinfect the area of operation without previous preparation; to sterilize instruments, suture material, dressings, and the hands of the surgeon, during the time that the patient is going under the anaesthetic. But the writer prefers to boil his instruments when he can, as the continued use of iodine tarnishes and blunts the cutting edges, though the same in a lesser degree holds for the soda solution. The writer uses iodine entirely to prepare his hands and it rarely causes irritation. It can be removed with boiled or raw starch, ammonia water, aromatic spirit of ammonia, hydrogen peroxide, Fowler's solution, or ether. If long periods of operating are expected, it is well to dip the hands in iodine and immediately decolorize with ammonia; rubber finger cots or rubber gloves; may be slipped on, and then redipped in the iodine. This is merely to protect the operator's hands from being dyed a deep brown, which is almost impossible to get rid of if the tincture is applied everyone or two days. The solution of one teaspoonful of the tincture to the quart of normal saline solution ('007 per cent.) is most efficacious for irrigation in all inflammatory and catarrhal conditions of mucous membrane. It can be used for conjunctivitis with prompt improvement.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

Excerpt published in 1911 August;10(39):52-53. Major F. T. Woodbury, Med. Corps, U.S. Army (New York Med. Jour.; Dec. 3, p. 1105J). The writer believes that iodine is the long-desired ideal antiseptic. It is cheap, easily obtained, portable in small bulk, efficient in high dilution, does not damage tissue, even when its vitality has been reduced by traumatism or infection, and though it has great powers of tissue penetration the writer has not yet seen a case of poisoning even when it is mopped in full strength on the peritoneum and in the parturient uterus. It can be used to disinfect the area of operation without previous preparation; to sterilize instruments, suture material, dressings, and the hands of the surgeon, during the time that the patient is going under the anaesthetic. But the writer prefers to boil his instruments when he can, as the continued use of iodine tarnishes and blunts the cutting edges, though the same in a lesser degree holds for the soda solution. The writer uses iodine entirely to prepare his hands and it rarely causes irritation. It can be removed with boiled or raw starch, ammonia water, aromatic spirit of ammonia, hydrogen peroxide, Fowler's solution, or ether. If long periods of operating are expected, it is well to dip the hands in iodine and immediately decolorize with ammonia; rubber finger cots or rubber gloves; may be slipped on, and then redipped in the iodine. This is merely to protect the operator's hands from being dyed a deep brown, which is almost impossible to get rid of if the tincture is applied everyone or two days. The solution of one teaspoonful of the tincture to the quart of normal saline solution ('007 per cent.) is most efficacious for irrigation in all inflammatory and catarrhal conditions of mucous membrane. It can be used for conjunctivitis with prompt improvement.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

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