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Excerpt from article "On Goitre" by Dr Colquhoun published in NZMJ 1910 Feb;8(33):17-71. RIMUWHARE, FAIRLIE, N.Z.—Dr. Cook writes:— \"1. Goitre is endemic in this district and is very common—' common in both males and females at puberty—also develops in both sexes commonly up to 35 years—very rarely see a case develop after 35 years—commonest form is parenchymatous or vascular, or a combination of both—occasionally I see cystic cases, but not often. 2. The only cause I can find is the snow water, which is commonly used here. A fair percentage of the drinking water in this district is highly charged with lime salts. Cases develop in patients using both forms of water. 3. Exophthalmic goitre is not common—have only seen four cases in 7½ years in this district. 4. I always treat all my cases of goitre with Iron tonics (if required), and use locally Ung: Hyd: Ox: Ruba. I get them to rub well into the neck each night, and at same time sit in front of the fire, with the neck exposed to the heat. All cases seem to respond to this treatment, and at end or three months the goitre as a rule is gone. Goitre is slightly more common in females than males here. I cannot recall a case that has not responded to the above treatment. Some goitres respond in a shorter time, but as a rule they are three months under treatment. All the cases I have seen have been in people who have been born here and lived here all their lives. Have not seen any cases in people who have lived here only a few years.\" WAIMATE.—Dr. H. C. Barclay was one of the first to draw attention to the usefulness of Adrenalin in active goitre. NELSON.—Dr. F. A. Bett's report is negative for both forms. PATEA.—Dr. Simmons' report is negative for both forms.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

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Excerpt from article "On Goitre" by Dr Colquhoun published in NZMJ 1910 Feb;8(33):17-71. RIMUWHARE, FAIRLIE, N.Z.—Dr. Cook writes:— \"1. Goitre is endemic in this district and is very common—' common in both males and females at puberty—also develops in both sexes commonly up to 35 years—very rarely see a case develop after 35 years—commonest form is parenchymatous or vascular, or a combination of both—occasionally I see cystic cases, but not often. 2. The only cause I can find is the snow water, which is commonly used here. A fair percentage of the drinking water in this district is highly charged with lime salts. Cases develop in patients using both forms of water. 3. Exophthalmic goitre is not common—have only seen four cases in 7½ years in this district. 4. I always treat all my cases of goitre with Iron tonics (if required), and use locally Ung: Hyd: Ox: Ruba. I get them to rub well into the neck each night, and at same time sit in front of the fire, with the neck exposed to the heat. All cases seem to respond to this treatment, and at end or three months the goitre as a rule is gone. Goitre is slightly more common in females than males here. I cannot recall a case that has not responded to the above treatment. Some goitres respond in a shorter time, but as a rule they are three months under treatment. All the cases I have seen have been in people who have been born here and lived here all their lives. Have not seen any cases in people who have lived here only a few years.\" WAIMATE.—Dr. H. C. Barclay was one of the first to draw attention to the usefulness of Adrenalin in active goitre. NELSON.—Dr. F. A. Bett's report is negative for both forms. PATEA.—Dr. Simmons' report is negative for both forms.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

Excerpt from article "On Goitre" by Dr Colquhoun published in NZMJ 1910 Feb;8(33):17-71. RIMUWHARE, FAIRLIE, N.Z.—Dr. Cook writes:— \"1. Goitre is endemic in this district and is very common—' common in both males and females at puberty—also develops in both sexes commonly up to 35 years—very rarely see a case develop after 35 years—commonest form is parenchymatous or vascular, or a combination of both—occasionally I see cystic cases, but not often. 2. The only cause I can find is the snow water, which is commonly used here. A fair percentage of the drinking water in this district is highly charged with lime salts. Cases develop in patients using both forms of water. 3. Exophthalmic goitre is not common—have only seen four cases in 7½ years in this district. 4. I always treat all my cases of goitre with Iron tonics (if required), and use locally Ung: Hyd: Ox: Ruba. I get them to rub well into the neck each night, and at same time sit in front of the fire, with the neck exposed to the heat. All cases seem to respond to this treatment, and at end or three months the goitre as a rule is gone. Goitre is slightly more common in females than males here. I cannot recall a case that has not responded to the above treatment. Some goitres respond in a shorter time, but as a rule they are three months under treatment. All the cases I have seen have been in people who have been born here and lived here all their lives. Have not seen any cases in people who have lived here only a few years.\" WAIMATE.—Dr. H. C. Barclay was one of the first to draw attention to the usefulness of Adrenalin in active goitre. NELSON.—Dr. F. A. Bett's report is negative for both forms. PATEA.—Dr. Simmons' report is negative for both forms.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

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