View Article PDF

October, 1916, points an epoch in the history of Parke, Davis and Co. The house was founded in 1866 just fifty years ago this month largely upon the optimism of three or four determined men, backed by a capital that would seem insignificant today. There was nothing in its unpretentious origin to foretell the success of after-years. And by success we mean not merely material prosperity, but also that broader and more enduring success that is based upon goodwill and confidence.Manufacturing pharmacy was then a crude, imperfect art. Bacteriology, pharmacology, and biological pharmacy were as yet unborn. There were no curative sera or vaccines in those days. Prophylaxis was in its infancy. Standardisation was unknown.Fifty years have wrought marvellous changes in means and methods for the treatment of human ills. The materia medica has been amplified beyond the dreams of the earlier investigators. Knowledge of pathology has immensely broadened. The empiricism of the past has given way to rational therapeutics, and medicine is taking its rightful place among the sciences.In all these forward movements Parke, Davis and Co. have had some part notably as discoverers of new vegetable drugs, as inventors of new chemical compounds, as pathfinders and producers in the field of biological manufacture, as investigators in original research, as pioneers in both chemical and physiological standardisation.The past half-century, as we have intimated, has been remarkable in its contributions to the newer materia medica. What will the next fifty years bring forward? Time alone can write the answer. Ours is a progressive age. The science of medicine has not reached its highest development. The physician s armamentarium will be further enlarged and fortified. New remedial agents will come into being. Many existing products will be improved. And with the fulfilment of these conditions Parke, Davis and Co. (if we may judge the future by the past) are certain to be identified.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

October, 1916, points an epoch in the history of Parke, Davis and Co. The house was founded in 1866 just fifty years ago this month largely upon the optimism of three or four determined men, backed by a capital that would seem insignificant today. There was nothing in its unpretentious origin to foretell the success of after-years. And by success we mean not merely material prosperity, but also that broader and more enduring success that is based upon goodwill and confidence.Manufacturing pharmacy was then a crude, imperfect art. Bacteriology, pharmacology, and biological pharmacy were as yet unborn. There were no curative sera or vaccines in those days. Prophylaxis was in its infancy. Standardisation was unknown.Fifty years have wrought marvellous changes in means and methods for the treatment of human ills. The materia medica has been amplified beyond the dreams of the earlier investigators. Knowledge of pathology has immensely broadened. The empiricism of the past has given way to rational therapeutics, and medicine is taking its rightful place among the sciences.In all these forward movements Parke, Davis and Co. have had some part notably as discoverers of new vegetable drugs, as inventors of new chemical compounds, as pathfinders and producers in the field of biological manufacture, as investigators in original research, as pioneers in both chemical and physiological standardisation.The past half-century, as we have intimated, has been remarkable in its contributions to the newer materia medica. What will the next fifty years bring forward? Time alone can write the answer. Ours is a progressive age. The science of medicine has not reached its highest development. The physician s armamentarium will be further enlarged and fortified. New remedial agents will come into being. Many existing products will be improved. And with the fulfilment of these conditions Parke, Davis and Co. (if we may judge the future by the past) are certain to be identified.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

October, 1916, points an epoch in the history of Parke, Davis and Co. The house was founded in 1866 just fifty years ago this month largely upon the optimism of three or four determined men, backed by a capital that would seem insignificant today. There was nothing in its unpretentious origin to foretell the success of after-years. And by success we mean not merely material prosperity, but also that broader and more enduring success that is based upon goodwill and confidence.Manufacturing pharmacy was then a crude, imperfect art. Bacteriology, pharmacology, and biological pharmacy were as yet unborn. There were no curative sera or vaccines in those days. Prophylaxis was in its infancy. Standardisation was unknown.Fifty years have wrought marvellous changes in means and methods for the treatment of human ills. The materia medica has been amplified beyond the dreams of the earlier investigators. Knowledge of pathology has immensely broadened. The empiricism of the past has given way to rational therapeutics, and medicine is taking its rightful place among the sciences.In all these forward movements Parke, Davis and Co. have had some part notably as discoverers of new vegetable drugs, as inventors of new chemical compounds, as pathfinders and producers in the field of biological manufacture, as investigators in original research, as pioneers in both chemical and physiological standardisation.The past half-century, as we have intimated, has been remarkable in its contributions to the newer materia medica. What will the next fifty years bring forward? Time alone can write the answer. Ours is a progressive age. The science of medicine has not reached its highest development. The physician s armamentarium will be further enlarged and fortified. New remedial agents will come into being. Many existing products will be improved. And with the fulfilment of these conditions Parke, Davis and Co. (if we may judge the future by the past) are certain to be identified.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

Subscriber Content

The full contents of this pages only available to subscribers.

LOGINSUBSCRIBE