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c


June 1918

I operated, a few years ago in Wellington, on Miss A. for the condition shown in the accompanying photograph No. 1. There was very marked proptosis of the right eyeball, which was also pressed downwards well below the level of the other eye. The mydriasis shown was artificially produced for purposes of opthalmoscopic examination. Vision nil. Optic atrophy.

A rounded swelling was very apparent between the globe and the superior orbital margin.

I decided to operate by Krönlein’s method for purposes of exploration and to save the eye if possible. This was happily effected with the very satisfactory result to the lady’s appearance as shown in photograph No. 2, taken at no very long date subsequently.

The tumour, which was the size of a walnut, turned out to be a cyst filled with an oily collection of cholesterin crystals, doubtless dermoid in origin.

The operation consisted in cutting down to the bone along the outer margin of the orbit, following its curve, for nearly half an inch each side of the external canthus; separating the periosteum and stripping it from the external orbital wall as far as possible; chiselling through the orbital margin above and below at each extremity of the wound and continuing backwards through the wall of the orbit in converging lines until they met in front of the inferior orbital fissure. The triangle of bone thus separated was then, with its external coverings, everted, giving ample access to the orbital cavity, from which, with a curved pair of medium-sized scissors and the fingers, the cyst was gradually separated from its attachments and completely removed. The loosened bone was finally pressed back into position and the wound stitched and dressed. Healing was complete in a few days and eventually the scar became hardly visible.

c

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

c


June 1918

I operated, a few years ago in Wellington, on Miss A. for the condition shown in the accompanying photograph No. 1. There was very marked proptosis of the right eyeball, which was also pressed downwards well below the level of the other eye. The mydriasis shown was artificially produced for purposes of opthalmoscopic examination. Vision nil. Optic atrophy.

A rounded swelling was very apparent between the globe and the superior orbital margin.

I decided to operate by Krönlein’s method for purposes of exploration and to save the eye if possible. This was happily effected with the very satisfactory result to the lady’s appearance as shown in photograph No. 2, taken at no very long date subsequently.

The tumour, which was the size of a walnut, turned out to be a cyst filled with an oily collection of cholesterin crystals, doubtless dermoid in origin.

The operation consisted in cutting down to the bone along the outer margin of the orbit, following its curve, for nearly half an inch each side of the external canthus; separating the periosteum and stripping it from the external orbital wall as far as possible; chiselling through the orbital margin above and below at each extremity of the wound and continuing backwards through the wall of the orbit in converging lines until they met in front of the inferior orbital fissure. The triangle of bone thus separated was then, with its external coverings, everted, giving ample access to the orbital cavity, from which, with a curved pair of medium-sized scissors and the fingers, the cyst was gradually separated from its attachments and completely removed. The loosened bone was finally pressed back into position and the wound stitched and dressed. Healing was complete in a few days and eventually the scar became hardly visible.

c

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

c


June 1918

I operated, a few years ago in Wellington, on Miss A. for the condition shown in the accompanying photograph No. 1. There was very marked proptosis of the right eyeball, which was also pressed downwards well below the level of the other eye. The mydriasis shown was artificially produced for purposes of opthalmoscopic examination. Vision nil. Optic atrophy.

A rounded swelling was very apparent between the globe and the superior orbital margin.

I decided to operate by Krönlein’s method for purposes of exploration and to save the eye if possible. This was happily effected with the very satisfactory result to the lady’s appearance as shown in photograph No. 2, taken at no very long date subsequently.

The tumour, which was the size of a walnut, turned out to be a cyst filled with an oily collection of cholesterin crystals, doubtless dermoid in origin.

The operation consisted in cutting down to the bone along the outer margin of the orbit, following its curve, for nearly half an inch each side of the external canthus; separating the periosteum and stripping it from the external orbital wall as far as possible; chiselling through the orbital margin above and below at each extremity of the wound and continuing backwards through the wall of the orbit in converging lines until they met in front of the inferior orbital fissure. The triangle of bone thus separated was then, with its external coverings, everted, giving ample access to the orbital cavity, from which, with a curved pair of medium-sized scissors and the fingers, the cyst was gradually separated from its attachments and completely removed. The loosened bone was finally pressed back into position and the wound stitched and dressed. Healing was complete in a few days and eventually the scar became hardly visible.

c

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

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