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Child with a toy, in a hospital, Dannevirke. Ref: 1/2-022222-G. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. /records/22332612

August 1919

On several occasions during the past few years I have sent notes to the NEW ZEALAND MEDICAL JOURNAL regarding the progress of this disease in a girl whose case I first reported in the JOURNAL of 29th August, 1891. In October last she died suddenly from heart failure and general weakness. No post-mortem examination was permitted, and thus a most unusual and interesting case has passed out of all further observation. As the younger generation of practitioners may not have access to the JOURNAL of 29th August, 1891, I may recapitulate the principal points in the case. The disease was first observed when the child was two years of age. It showed itself as a hard lump about the middle of the left sterno-mastoid muscle. After this a series of lumps appeared, disappeared, and reappeared in various positions upon the head and trunk. The disease steadily progressed in spite of all treatment, and has now ended fatally. ln some remarks I made in the original paper I have noted that Dr. Lendon, of Adelaide, who reported a case to the first Intercolonial Congress in 1887, says: “In my own case, and I think, also, in that of William Clark, the case in the Museum of the Royal College of Surgeons, London, it is a noted fact that the disease is mainly situated in the muscles of the appendicular skeleton and has spared those of the axial skeleton.”

Now, in my case the reverse is the fact. The occurrence of nodes in this case, their appearance, disappearance, and reappearance, lends some colour to the theory that it may have had its origin in some syphilitic taint. Nothing, however, has been detected in the family history to warrant any such conclusion. In a note I sent to the JOURNAL in August, 1905, I stated: “The internal organs are apparently healthy and seemingly not involved in the general degeneration going on in the external muscles.” In 1905 the muscles of the legs were not very much involved, but since then they also became involved, so that the whole of the external muscular system latterly became more or less diseased. She was able to move about in a more or less helpless manner until some twelve months ago, but since then she has been entirely confined to home and to bed, her whole frame being quite rigid. She had entirely lost all power of expanding her chest and movement in the muscles of the abdomen. Strange, too, she could neither smile nor laugh, so her face always held one fixed gaze as if dead. She could neither feed herself, nor dress herself, nor wash herself, nor lie down, nor rise up—in short, she became a helpless infant. She also suffered from bradycardia and slow, irregular respiration. Her mental faculties were very feeble, but she developed a species of cunning which served her purposes to some extent. Her left sterno-mastoid muscle, completely ossified, was removed whilst she was an inmate of the Dunedin Hospital in 1891.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

c

Child with a toy, in a hospital, Dannevirke. Ref: 1/2-022222-G. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. /records/22332612

August 1919

On several occasions during the past few years I have sent notes to the NEW ZEALAND MEDICAL JOURNAL regarding the progress of this disease in a girl whose case I first reported in the JOURNAL of 29th August, 1891. In October last she died suddenly from heart failure and general weakness. No post-mortem examination was permitted, and thus a most unusual and interesting case has passed out of all further observation. As the younger generation of practitioners may not have access to the JOURNAL of 29th August, 1891, I may recapitulate the principal points in the case. The disease was first observed when the child was two years of age. It showed itself as a hard lump about the middle of the left sterno-mastoid muscle. After this a series of lumps appeared, disappeared, and reappeared in various positions upon the head and trunk. The disease steadily progressed in spite of all treatment, and has now ended fatally. ln some remarks I made in the original paper I have noted that Dr. Lendon, of Adelaide, who reported a case to the first Intercolonial Congress in 1887, says: “In my own case, and I think, also, in that of William Clark, the case in the Museum of the Royal College of Surgeons, London, it is a noted fact that the disease is mainly situated in the muscles of the appendicular skeleton and has spared those of the axial skeleton.”

Now, in my case the reverse is the fact. The occurrence of nodes in this case, their appearance, disappearance, and reappearance, lends some colour to the theory that it may have had its origin in some syphilitic taint. Nothing, however, has been detected in the family history to warrant any such conclusion. In a note I sent to the JOURNAL in August, 1905, I stated: “The internal organs are apparently healthy and seemingly not involved in the general degeneration going on in the external muscles.” In 1905 the muscles of the legs were not very much involved, but since then they also became involved, so that the whole of the external muscular system latterly became more or less diseased. She was able to move about in a more or less helpless manner until some twelve months ago, but since then she has been entirely confined to home and to bed, her whole frame being quite rigid. She had entirely lost all power of expanding her chest and movement in the muscles of the abdomen. Strange, too, she could neither smile nor laugh, so her face always held one fixed gaze as if dead. She could neither feed herself, nor dress herself, nor wash herself, nor lie down, nor rise up—in short, she became a helpless infant. She also suffered from bradycardia and slow, irregular respiration. Her mental faculties were very feeble, but she developed a species of cunning which served her purposes to some extent. Her left sterno-mastoid muscle, completely ossified, was removed whilst she was an inmate of the Dunedin Hospital in 1891.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

c

Child with a toy, in a hospital, Dannevirke. Ref: 1/2-022222-G. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. /records/22332612

August 1919

On several occasions during the past few years I have sent notes to the NEW ZEALAND MEDICAL JOURNAL regarding the progress of this disease in a girl whose case I first reported in the JOURNAL of 29th August, 1891. In October last she died suddenly from heart failure and general weakness. No post-mortem examination was permitted, and thus a most unusual and interesting case has passed out of all further observation. As the younger generation of practitioners may not have access to the JOURNAL of 29th August, 1891, I may recapitulate the principal points in the case. The disease was first observed when the child was two years of age. It showed itself as a hard lump about the middle of the left sterno-mastoid muscle. After this a series of lumps appeared, disappeared, and reappeared in various positions upon the head and trunk. The disease steadily progressed in spite of all treatment, and has now ended fatally. ln some remarks I made in the original paper I have noted that Dr. Lendon, of Adelaide, who reported a case to the first Intercolonial Congress in 1887, says: “In my own case, and I think, also, in that of William Clark, the case in the Museum of the Royal College of Surgeons, London, it is a noted fact that the disease is mainly situated in the muscles of the appendicular skeleton and has spared those of the axial skeleton.”

Now, in my case the reverse is the fact. The occurrence of nodes in this case, their appearance, disappearance, and reappearance, lends some colour to the theory that it may have had its origin in some syphilitic taint. Nothing, however, has been detected in the family history to warrant any such conclusion. In a note I sent to the JOURNAL in August, 1905, I stated: “The internal organs are apparently healthy and seemingly not involved in the general degeneration going on in the external muscles.” In 1905 the muscles of the legs were not very much involved, but since then they also became involved, so that the whole of the external muscular system latterly became more or less diseased. She was able to move about in a more or less helpless manner until some twelve months ago, but since then she has been entirely confined to home and to bed, her whole frame being quite rigid. She had entirely lost all power of expanding her chest and movement in the muscles of the abdomen. Strange, too, she could neither smile nor laugh, so her face always held one fixed gaze as if dead. She could neither feed herself, nor dress herself, nor wash herself, nor lie down, nor rise up—in short, she became a helpless infant. She also suffered from bradycardia and slow, irregular respiration. Her mental faculties were very feeble, but she developed a species of cunning which served her purposes to some extent. Her left sterno-mastoid muscle, completely ossified, was removed whilst she was an inmate of the Dunedin Hospital in 1891.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

View Article PDF

c

Child with a toy, in a hospital, Dannevirke. Ref: 1/2-022222-G. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. /records/22332612

August 1919

On several occasions during the past few years I have sent notes to the NEW ZEALAND MEDICAL JOURNAL regarding the progress of this disease in a girl whose case I first reported in the JOURNAL of 29th August, 1891. In October last she died suddenly from heart failure and general weakness. No post-mortem examination was permitted, and thus a most unusual and interesting case has passed out of all further observation. As the younger generation of practitioners may not have access to the JOURNAL of 29th August, 1891, I may recapitulate the principal points in the case. The disease was first observed when the child was two years of age. It showed itself as a hard lump about the middle of the left sterno-mastoid muscle. After this a series of lumps appeared, disappeared, and reappeared in various positions upon the head and trunk. The disease steadily progressed in spite of all treatment, and has now ended fatally. ln some remarks I made in the original paper I have noted that Dr. Lendon, of Adelaide, who reported a case to the first Intercolonial Congress in 1887, says: “In my own case, and I think, also, in that of William Clark, the case in the Museum of the Royal College of Surgeons, London, it is a noted fact that the disease is mainly situated in the muscles of the appendicular skeleton and has spared those of the axial skeleton.”

Now, in my case the reverse is the fact. The occurrence of nodes in this case, their appearance, disappearance, and reappearance, lends some colour to the theory that it may have had its origin in some syphilitic taint. Nothing, however, has been detected in the family history to warrant any such conclusion. In a note I sent to the JOURNAL in August, 1905, I stated: “The internal organs are apparently healthy and seemingly not involved in the general degeneration going on in the external muscles.” In 1905 the muscles of the legs were not very much involved, but since then they also became involved, so that the whole of the external muscular system latterly became more or less diseased. She was able to move about in a more or less helpless manner until some twelve months ago, but since then she has been entirely confined to home and to bed, her whole frame being quite rigid. She had entirely lost all power of expanding her chest and movement in the muscles of the abdomen. Strange, too, she could neither smile nor laugh, so her face always held one fixed gaze as if dead. She could neither feed herself, nor dress herself, nor wash herself, nor lie down, nor rise up—in short, she became a helpless infant. She also suffered from bradycardia and slow, irregular respiration. Her mental faculties were very feeble, but she developed a species of cunning which served her purposes to some extent. Her left sterno-mastoid muscle, completely ossified, was removed whilst she was an inmate of the Dunedin Hospital in 1891.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

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