View Article PDF

Published in NZMJ 1913 Feb;12(45):380.OBITUARYIt is with deep regret that we record the death of Dr George Wilson of Palmerston North. His death was the result of appendicitis. After practising in Edinburgh and Glasgow, Dr Wilson came to New Zealand in 1892, establishing himself in Palmerston, where he was known as a highly successful surgeon and physician. He took a keen interest in the affairs of our Association, and in everything that affected the welfare of the profession.REVIEWS\"The Illness and Death of Napoleon Bonaparte\" (a medical criticism) by Arnold Chaplin, M.D., 112 pages. Three Illustrations. Hirschfield Bros., London. Alex Stenhouse, Glasgow. Price 2/6.This is a most interesting little book. The various doctors who attended Napoleon have left conflicting accounts of his illness, and Dr. Chaplin has therefore drawn his information directly from the Lowe papers in the British Museum.Anything connected with Napoleon's life or death is a matter of absorbing interest. This book shows clearly that the cause of death was carcinomatous infiltration of an ulcer situated round the lesser curvature of the stomach.The liver was found to be healthy at the post-mortem examination, much to the surprise of the French doctors who believed that Napoleon suffered from a complaint of the liver, the result of being imprisoned by the British in a tropical and unhealthy island. The apex of the left lung contained tuberculous cavities, and the bladder was diseased and contained calculi.The diagnosis of cancer was made far too late, and this cannot be condoned, for even at the time of Napoleon's illness there was enough known on the subject of diagnosis of gastric cancer to justify a fairly early diagnosis in the case of the Emperor. The pathological specimens in the Museum of the Royal College of Surgeons in London, reputed to have been taken from the body of Napoleon, cannot be accepted as authentic.It is evident that all whose official duty brought them into contact with the august patient of St. Helena had an exceedingly bad time, from Sir Hudson Lowe downwards.Napoleon was a very refractory patient, but there is no doubt that he was a great sufferer.We can recommend this book by Dr. Chaplin as being constructive and interesting.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

Published in NZMJ 1913 Feb;12(45):380.OBITUARYIt is with deep regret that we record the death of Dr George Wilson of Palmerston North. His death was the result of appendicitis. After practising in Edinburgh and Glasgow, Dr Wilson came to New Zealand in 1892, establishing himself in Palmerston, where he was known as a highly successful surgeon and physician. He took a keen interest in the affairs of our Association, and in everything that affected the welfare of the profession.REVIEWS\"The Illness and Death of Napoleon Bonaparte\" (a medical criticism) by Arnold Chaplin, M.D., 112 pages. Three Illustrations. Hirschfield Bros., London. Alex Stenhouse, Glasgow. Price 2/6.This is a most interesting little book. The various doctors who attended Napoleon have left conflicting accounts of his illness, and Dr. Chaplin has therefore drawn his information directly from the Lowe papers in the British Museum.Anything connected with Napoleon's life or death is a matter of absorbing interest. This book shows clearly that the cause of death was carcinomatous infiltration of an ulcer situated round the lesser curvature of the stomach.The liver was found to be healthy at the post-mortem examination, much to the surprise of the French doctors who believed that Napoleon suffered from a complaint of the liver, the result of being imprisoned by the British in a tropical and unhealthy island. The apex of the left lung contained tuberculous cavities, and the bladder was diseased and contained calculi.The diagnosis of cancer was made far too late, and this cannot be condoned, for even at the time of Napoleon's illness there was enough known on the subject of diagnosis of gastric cancer to justify a fairly early diagnosis in the case of the Emperor. The pathological specimens in the Museum of the Royal College of Surgeons in London, reputed to have been taken from the body of Napoleon, cannot be accepted as authentic.It is evident that all whose official duty brought them into contact with the august patient of St. Helena had an exceedingly bad time, from Sir Hudson Lowe downwards.Napoleon was a very refractory patient, but there is no doubt that he was a great sufferer.We can recommend this book by Dr. Chaplin as being constructive and interesting.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

Published in NZMJ 1913 Feb;12(45):380.OBITUARYIt is with deep regret that we record the death of Dr George Wilson of Palmerston North. His death was the result of appendicitis. After practising in Edinburgh and Glasgow, Dr Wilson came to New Zealand in 1892, establishing himself in Palmerston, where he was known as a highly successful surgeon and physician. He took a keen interest in the affairs of our Association, and in everything that affected the welfare of the profession.REVIEWS\"The Illness and Death of Napoleon Bonaparte\" (a medical criticism) by Arnold Chaplin, M.D., 112 pages. Three Illustrations. Hirschfield Bros., London. Alex Stenhouse, Glasgow. Price 2/6.This is a most interesting little book. The various doctors who attended Napoleon have left conflicting accounts of his illness, and Dr. Chaplin has therefore drawn his information directly from the Lowe papers in the British Museum.Anything connected with Napoleon's life or death is a matter of absorbing interest. This book shows clearly that the cause of death was carcinomatous infiltration of an ulcer situated round the lesser curvature of the stomach.The liver was found to be healthy at the post-mortem examination, much to the surprise of the French doctors who believed that Napoleon suffered from a complaint of the liver, the result of being imprisoned by the British in a tropical and unhealthy island. The apex of the left lung contained tuberculous cavities, and the bladder was diseased and contained calculi.The diagnosis of cancer was made far too late, and this cannot be condoned, for even at the time of Napoleon's illness there was enough known on the subject of diagnosis of gastric cancer to justify a fairly early diagnosis in the case of the Emperor. The pathological specimens in the Museum of the Royal College of Surgeons in London, reputed to have been taken from the body of Napoleon, cannot be accepted as authentic.It is evident that all whose official duty brought them into contact with the august patient of St. Helena had an exceedingly bad time, from Sir Hudson Lowe downwards.Napoleon was a very refractory patient, but there is no doubt that he was a great sufferer.We can recommend this book by Dr. Chaplin as being constructive and interesting.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

Subscriber Content

The full contents of this pages only available to subscribers.

LOGINSUBSCRIBE