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On July 1st, Dr. Brown died suddenly in an attack of angina pectoris. No doctor in the South Island was more widely known, during the years of his active work, and none gained more widely the respect and affection of colleagues and patients. His connection with Dunedin began in 1875, when he commenced practice there and quickly became a prominent figure among his professional brethren, and for many years enjoyed a large practice among all classes of the community. This mile of his life was marked by continual charities and help to his poorer patients. They were always his favourites, and when he gave up practice in Dunedin it was his chief regret that he was leaving so many of the poor \"old bodies\" whom he had attended for so many years.Professionally he quickly made his mark. His appointment to the staff of the Dunedin Hospital gave him the opportunity of surgical practice, which he desired, and later on, when the Medical School was established, he was appointed Lecturer on Surgery, this being the first appointment of a teacher in the practical side of medical education. In 1882 he made a visit to the Old Country, to examine methods of teaching and practice and returned in 1883, full of energy and enthusiasm in his work. For the next ten years he was a very prominent figure in the growing Medical School. His steady common sense was of great value in the somewhat adventurous experiment of launching a Medical School in so small a community as Otago, and the various changes which had to be made in local hospital government and construction were made easier by his tact and knowledge.As a teacher he was clear and accurate and quickly gained the confidence of his pupils, and it was a matter of great regret to his colleagues when he decided to give up that branch of his work. Then followed two or three years travel in Europe and America. He returned about the middle nineties to practise in Dunedin but did not begin University work again.He was keenly interested in all educational questions, and served on the High School and Education Boards, besides doing much other public work. When he retired from practice about 1904 he went Home again to Scotland, but returned to New Zealand about 1912, settling first in Marton and later in Dunedin. He had always been a man of good physique and health, but it was observed by his friends on his return to Dunedin in 1914 that there were signs of heart failure. He did not resume practice, but took up work on the Patriotic Committee, and by a very general wish of many of the citizens he became a member of the Hospital and Charitable Aid Board, doing most valuable work for these bodies up to the day of his death.A full and busy life ended suddenly, probably as he would have wished. He knew well that the end could not be far off and that it would probably come suddenly, but his courage never failed, nor did any complaint pass his lips. In trying to estimate his character and influence, the chief thing which struck those who knew him well was the universal feeling of friendliness which he inspired.In whatever work he was engaged, private or professional, those who were his colleagues became his friends. He had a \"genius for friendship\"; all sorts and conditions of men and women who came in contact with him experienced the same feeling. It is difficult to define what is at the bottom of such an influence: charity, goodness, cleverness, public spirit, are not sufficient; all these may be present and leave us cold, but in Dr. Brown there was an immense gift of sympathy, invaluable to a doctor above all men, which probably was the secret of this universal feeling of personal friendliness to him. Among his intimate friends he was always a delightful companion. He had travelled much and read much. His interests were catholic in the extreme politics, literature, sociology, interested him to the last, and in the widest sense of the word he was a religious man, in the smallest and the greatest things placing duty first.The following notice taken from the Dunedin \"Evening Star\" gives some further details of his life and of the esteem in which he was held by his fellow-citizens: \"He was born in 1845, in Banffshire, Scotland, the son of a farmer. He received his preliminary education at the gymnasium of Old Aberdeen, then graduated at the universities, taking the arts course at Aberdeen, where he distinguished himself in classics and mathematics, and gained the M.A. degree in 1867 and qualifying in the medical course at the Edinburgh University, which in 1870 bestowed on him the degrees of M.B. and C.M.He went out to China as a medical missionary of the Baptist Church, and was for three years located at Che-Foo, where he conducted a hospital for the natives. He came to Dunedin in 1875. The ship by which he travelled from China was wrecked on the Queensland coast. Shortly after arrival here he started the practice of his profession, his surgery being in Princes Street, in the same building as that in which Mr. Downie Stewart the elder had his law chambers. Before long he removed to High Street. He joined the honorary medical staff of the Dunedin hospital, and was for some years lecturer on surgery at the Otago Medical School. He took a keen interest in education questions, and bestowed much time on his duties as chairman of the High Schools Board of Governors, whilst he also held a seat on the Otago Education Board, and became chairman of that body.Outdoor sports also claimed his attention. He was a golfer, and at one time held the office of captain of the Otago Golf Club; he also became president of the New Zealand Amateur Athletic Association. After some years residence in Dunedin the doctor paid a visit to the Old Country. Before his departure his many friends entertained him at a banquet.On his return to Dunedin he resumed the practice of his profession, and eventually sold out to Dr. Church and went to Tauranga, that place being chosen on account of his wife s health. He stayed at Tauranga for a couple of years. Having some leisure, for he did not practise there, the doctor interested himself in education matters, and sat on the local school committee. Then he went Home once more, and stayed for some years. Whilst in Scotland he was closely associated with his brother-in-law, Mr. Thomas Johnston, managing director of Nobel s Explosives Company in Glasgow.After returning to New Zealand, Dr. Brown went to live near Marton, but the climate did not suit Mrs. Brown, and they came back to Dunedin three or four years ago. The doctor then acquired an interest in the Ashburn Hall Asylum, and he occupied himself also in his duties on the Hospital and Charitable Aid Board and as a member of the Otago Patriotic Association. In 1871 he married a daughter of Mr. John Johnston, of Edinburgh, and they had one child, a daughter, who died whilst young. Mrs. Brown survives her husband.The internment took place this morning, privately, but there were quite a number of close personal friends at the service in St. Matthew s Church. The deceased was a loveable man, very outspoken and sincere, but always most kind and considerate. His old clients invariably made him a personal friend. The feeling of respect entertained towards him by the community as a whole was shown on the occasion of his removal to Tauranga. There was a big meeting at His Majesty s Theatre, and all sorts of honours were showered upon him.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

On July 1st, Dr. Brown died suddenly in an attack of angina pectoris. No doctor in the South Island was more widely known, during the years of his active work, and none gained more widely the respect and affection of colleagues and patients. His connection with Dunedin began in 1875, when he commenced practice there and quickly became a prominent figure among his professional brethren, and for many years enjoyed a large practice among all classes of the community. This mile of his life was marked by continual charities and help to his poorer patients. They were always his favourites, and when he gave up practice in Dunedin it was his chief regret that he was leaving so many of the poor \"old bodies\" whom he had attended for so many years.Professionally he quickly made his mark. His appointment to the staff of the Dunedin Hospital gave him the opportunity of surgical practice, which he desired, and later on, when the Medical School was established, he was appointed Lecturer on Surgery, this being the first appointment of a teacher in the practical side of medical education. In 1882 he made a visit to the Old Country, to examine methods of teaching and practice and returned in 1883, full of energy and enthusiasm in his work. For the next ten years he was a very prominent figure in the growing Medical School. His steady common sense was of great value in the somewhat adventurous experiment of launching a Medical School in so small a community as Otago, and the various changes which had to be made in local hospital government and construction were made easier by his tact and knowledge.As a teacher he was clear and accurate and quickly gained the confidence of his pupils, and it was a matter of great regret to his colleagues when he decided to give up that branch of his work. Then followed two or three years travel in Europe and America. He returned about the middle nineties to practise in Dunedin but did not begin University work again.He was keenly interested in all educational questions, and served on the High School and Education Boards, besides doing much other public work. When he retired from practice about 1904 he went Home again to Scotland, but returned to New Zealand about 1912, settling first in Marton and later in Dunedin. He had always been a man of good physique and health, but it was observed by his friends on his return to Dunedin in 1914 that there were signs of heart failure. He did not resume practice, but took up work on the Patriotic Committee, and by a very general wish of many of the citizens he became a member of the Hospital and Charitable Aid Board, doing most valuable work for these bodies up to the day of his death.A full and busy life ended suddenly, probably as he would have wished. He knew well that the end could not be far off and that it would probably come suddenly, but his courage never failed, nor did any complaint pass his lips. In trying to estimate his character and influence, the chief thing which struck those who knew him well was the universal feeling of friendliness which he inspired.In whatever work he was engaged, private or professional, those who were his colleagues became his friends. He had a \"genius for friendship\"; all sorts and conditions of men and women who came in contact with him experienced the same feeling. It is difficult to define what is at the bottom of such an influence: charity, goodness, cleverness, public spirit, are not sufficient; all these may be present and leave us cold, but in Dr. Brown there was an immense gift of sympathy, invaluable to a doctor above all men, which probably was the secret of this universal feeling of personal friendliness to him. Among his intimate friends he was always a delightful companion. He had travelled much and read much. His interests were catholic in the extreme politics, literature, sociology, interested him to the last, and in the widest sense of the word he was a religious man, in the smallest and the greatest things placing duty first.The following notice taken from the Dunedin \"Evening Star\" gives some further details of his life and of the esteem in which he was held by his fellow-citizens: \"He was born in 1845, in Banffshire, Scotland, the son of a farmer. He received his preliminary education at the gymnasium of Old Aberdeen, then graduated at the universities, taking the arts course at Aberdeen, where he distinguished himself in classics and mathematics, and gained the M.A. degree in 1867 and qualifying in the medical course at the Edinburgh University, which in 1870 bestowed on him the degrees of M.B. and C.M.He went out to China as a medical missionary of the Baptist Church, and was for three years located at Che-Foo, where he conducted a hospital for the natives. He came to Dunedin in 1875. The ship by which he travelled from China was wrecked on the Queensland coast. Shortly after arrival here he started the practice of his profession, his surgery being in Princes Street, in the same building as that in which Mr. Downie Stewart the elder had his law chambers. Before long he removed to High Street. He joined the honorary medical staff of the Dunedin hospital, and was for some years lecturer on surgery at the Otago Medical School. He took a keen interest in education questions, and bestowed much time on his duties as chairman of the High Schools Board of Governors, whilst he also held a seat on the Otago Education Board, and became chairman of that body.Outdoor sports also claimed his attention. He was a golfer, and at one time held the office of captain of the Otago Golf Club; he also became president of the New Zealand Amateur Athletic Association. After some years residence in Dunedin the doctor paid a visit to the Old Country. Before his departure his many friends entertained him at a banquet.On his return to Dunedin he resumed the practice of his profession, and eventually sold out to Dr. Church and went to Tauranga, that place being chosen on account of his wife s health. He stayed at Tauranga for a couple of years. Having some leisure, for he did not practise there, the doctor interested himself in education matters, and sat on the local school committee. Then he went Home once more, and stayed for some years. Whilst in Scotland he was closely associated with his brother-in-law, Mr. Thomas Johnston, managing director of Nobel s Explosives Company in Glasgow.After returning to New Zealand, Dr. Brown went to live near Marton, but the climate did not suit Mrs. Brown, and they came back to Dunedin three or four years ago. The doctor then acquired an interest in the Ashburn Hall Asylum, and he occupied himself also in his duties on the Hospital and Charitable Aid Board and as a member of the Otago Patriotic Association. In 1871 he married a daughter of Mr. John Johnston, of Edinburgh, and they had one child, a daughter, who died whilst young. Mrs. Brown survives her husband.The internment took place this morning, privately, but there were quite a number of close personal friends at the service in St. Matthew s Church. The deceased was a loveable man, very outspoken and sincere, but always most kind and considerate. His old clients invariably made him a personal friend. The feeling of respect entertained towards him by the community as a whole was shown on the occasion of his removal to Tauranga. There was a big meeting at His Majesty s Theatre, and all sorts of honours were showered upon him.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

On July 1st, Dr. Brown died suddenly in an attack of angina pectoris. No doctor in the South Island was more widely known, during the years of his active work, and none gained more widely the respect and affection of colleagues and patients. His connection with Dunedin began in 1875, when he commenced practice there and quickly became a prominent figure among his professional brethren, and for many years enjoyed a large practice among all classes of the community. This mile of his life was marked by continual charities and help to his poorer patients. They were always his favourites, and when he gave up practice in Dunedin it was his chief regret that he was leaving so many of the poor \"old bodies\" whom he had attended for so many years.Professionally he quickly made his mark. His appointment to the staff of the Dunedin Hospital gave him the opportunity of surgical practice, which he desired, and later on, when the Medical School was established, he was appointed Lecturer on Surgery, this being the first appointment of a teacher in the practical side of medical education. In 1882 he made a visit to the Old Country, to examine methods of teaching and practice and returned in 1883, full of energy and enthusiasm in his work. For the next ten years he was a very prominent figure in the growing Medical School. His steady common sense was of great value in the somewhat adventurous experiment of launching a Medical School in so small a community as Otago, and the various changes which had to be made in local hospital government and construction were made easier by his tact and knowledge.As a teacher he was clear and accurate and quickly gained the confidence of his pupils, and it was a matter of great regret to his colleagues when he decided to give up that branch of his work. Then followed two or three years travel in Europe and America. He returned about the middle nineties to practise in Dunedin but did not begin University work again.He was keenly interested in all educational questions, and served on the High School and Education Boards, besides doing much other public work. When he retired from practice about 1904 he went Home again to Scotland, but returned to New Zealand about 1912, settling first in Marton and later in Dunedin. He had always been a man of good physique and health, but it was observed by his friends on his return to Dunedin in 1914 that there were signs of heart failure. He did not resume practice, but took up work on the Patriotic Committee, and by a very general wish of many of the citizens he became a member of the Hospital and Charitable Aid Board, doing most valuable work for these bodies up to the day of his death.A full and busy life ended suddenly, probably as he would have wished. He knew well that the end could not be far off and that it would probably come suddenly, but his courage never failed, nor did any complaint pass his lips. In trying to estimate his character and influence, the chief thing which struck those who knew him well was the universal feeling of friendliness which he inspired.In whatever work he was engaged, private or professional, those who were his colleagues became his friends. He had a \"genius for friendship\"; all sorts and conditions of men and women who came in contact with him experienced the same feeling. It is difficult to define what is at the bottom of such an influence: charity, goodness, cleverness, public spirit, are not sufficient; all these may be present and leave us cold, but in Dr. Brown there was an immense gift of sympathy, invaluable to a doctor above all men, which probably was the secret of this universal feeling of personal friendliness to him. Among his intimate friends he was always a delightful companion. He had travelled much and read much. His interests were catholic in the extreme politics, literature, sociology, interested him to the last, and in the widest sense of the word he was a religious man, in the smallest and the greatest things placing duty first.The following notice taken from the Dunedin \"Evening Star\" gives some further details of his life and of the esteem in which he was held by his fellow-citizens: \"He was born in 1845, in Banffshire, Scotland, the son of a farmer. He received his preliminary education at the gymnasium of Old Aberdeen, then graduated at the universities, taking the arts course at Aberdeen, where he distinguished himself in classics and mathematics, and gained the M.A. degree in 1867 and qualifying in the medical course at the Edinburgh University, which in 1870 bestowed on him the degrees of M.B. and C.M.He went out to China as a medical missionary of the Baptist Church, and was for three years located at Che-Foo, where he conducted a hospital for the natives. He came to Dunedin in 1875. The ship by which he travelled from China was wrecked on the Queensland coast. Shortly after arrival here he started the practice of his profession, his surgery being in Princes Street, in the same building as that in which Mr. Downie Stewart the elder had his law chambers. Before long he removed to High Street. He joined the honorary medical staff of the Dunedin hospital, and was for some years lecturer on surgery at the Otago Medical School. He took a keen interest in education questions, and bestowed much time on his duties as chairman of the High Schools Board of Governors, whilst he also held a seat on the Otago Education Board, and became chairman of that body.Outdoor sports also claimed his attention. He was a golfer, and at one time held the office of captain of the Otago Golf Club; he also became president of the New Zealand Amateur Athletic Association. After some years residence in Dunedin the doctor paid a visit to the Old Country. Before his departure his many friends entertained him at a banquet.On his return to Dunedin he resumed the practice of his profession, and eventually sold out to Dr. Church and went to Tauranga, that place being chosen on account of his wife s health. He stayed at Tauranga for a couple of years. Having some leisure, for he did not practise there, the doctor interested himself in education matters, and sat on the local school committee. Then he went Home once more, and stayed for some years. Whilst in Scotland he was closely associated with his brother-in-law, Mr. Thomas Johnston, managing director of Nobel s Explosives Company in Glasgow.After returning to New Zealand, Dr. Brown went to live near Marton, but the climate did not suit Mrs. Brown, and they came back to Dunedin three or four years ago. The doctor then acquired an interest in the Ashburn Hall Asylum, and he occupied himself also in his duties on the Hospital and Charitable Aid Board and as a member of the Otago Patriotic Association. In 1871 he married a daughter of Mr. John Johnston, of Edinburgh, and they had one child, a daughter, who died whilst young. Mrs. Brown survives her husband.The internment took place this morning, privately, but there were quite a number of close personal friends at the service in St. Matthew s Church. The deceased was a loveable man, very outspoken and sincere, but always most kind and considerate. His old clients invariably made him a personal friend. The feeling of respect entertained towards him by the community as a whole was shown on the occasion of his removal to Tauranga. There was a big meeting at His Majesty s Theatre, and all sorts of honours were showered upon him.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

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