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Third part of an article by Dr Colquhoun, Dunedin, published in NZMJ 1910;9(36):33-37. Continued from part 2 at http://www.nzma.org.nz/journal/124-1328/4523Such an institution [secondary hospital] would take in all those cases which are now disadvantageously placed at the Benevolent, and many which are left to die miserably in unsuitable homes. It would be at once a humane home for incurables and a convalescent station. In its grounds it could accommodate the few infectious cases which from time to time arise in Dunedin, and also the more frequently occurring cases of tuberculosis. Dunedin is fortunate in having in its immediate neighbourhood land suited for this purpose which can be obtained at a moderate figure.It is well known than the late Dr. McGregor, Inspector of Hospitals, was always opposed to continuing the Hospital on its present site. He held that the site was swampy, dusty, and contracted in extent and unsuited for an expanding institution. On the other hand it was contended that the true place for a Hospital is where it is most wanted, and that the present site, however objectionable from hygienic reasons, was the only possible one for supplying the wants of the city. Both views were reasonable, and both would be met by the recognition of the fact that a city Hospital should consist of two departments—a Primary and a Secondary. The Primary Hospital, besides providing accommodation and treatment for acute cases, would still retain the out-patient department.Another much-needed reform which would be made possible would be the establishment of an observation ward for mental cases. At present suspected lunatics are sent either to gaol or to the Magistrate's Court for examination. These are humiliations which the State has no right to inflict on the honest poor. We might as well send a consumptive patient to prison as treat by the methods of the criminal court those unfortunates whose disease happens to be in their brain cells. Their proper place, until duly certified as insane, is in the public hospital.It may be objected to these proposals that they will cost money. Certainly they will, but not as much as the present system. It is in the long run the truest and best economy to deal with all cases of sickness the most effectual way that can be devised. No one can assent truthfully that we are doing so at present.To sum up the imperfections of the present arrangements, we may say : No provision is trade for many infectious diseases. No provision is made for consumptives. No provision is made for Mental Cases. No provision is made for Alcoholic Cases. No provision is made for Epilepsy. Acute and Chronic and Convalescent cases treated in the same wards. No provision is made for very young children. The general principle enumerated above—that a Primary and a Secondary Hospital are required—is not new. It has been successfully carried out in New York and other American cities, in the field during war, and is obviously destined to govern the work all great hospitals everywhere in the future.———Since the above was written, Dunedin has been supplied with a Hospital for Infectious Diseases and a Sanatorium for cases of Early Consumption. The other conditions are unaltered.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

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Third part of an article by Dr Colquhoun, Dunedin, published in NZMJ 1910;9(36):33-37. Continued from part 2 at http://www.nzma.org.nz/journal/124-1328/4523Such an institution [secondary hospital] would take in all those cases which are now disadvantageously placed at the Benevolent, and many which are left to die miserably in unsuitable homes. It would be at once a humane home for incurables and a convalescent station. In its grounds it could accommodate the few infectious cases which from time to time arise in Dunedin, and also the more frequently occurring cases of tuberculosis. Dunedin is fortunate in having in its immediate neighbourhood land suited for this purpose which can be obtained at a moderate figure.It is well known than the late Dr. McGregor, Inspector of Hospitals, was always opposed to continuing the Hospital on its present site. He held that the site was swampy, dusty, and contracted in extent and unsuited for an expanding institution. On the other hand it was contended that the true place for a Hospital is where it is most wanted, and that the present site, however objectionable from hygienic reasons, was the only possible one for supplying the wants of the city. Both views were reasonable, and both would be met by the recognition of the fact that a city Hospital should consist of two departments—a Primary and a Secondary. The Primary Hospital, besides providing accommodation and treatment for acute cases, would still retain the out-patient department.Another much-needed reform which would be made possible would be the establishment of an observation ward for mental cases. At present suspected lunatics are sent either to gaol or to the Magistrate's Court for examination. These are humiliations which the State has no right to inflict on the honest poor. We might as well send a consumptive patient to prison as treat by the methods of the criminal court those unfortunates whose disease happens to be in their brain cells. Their proper place, until duly certified as insane, is in the public hospital.It may be objected to these proposals that they will cost money. Certainly they will, but not as much as the present system. It is in the long run the truest and best economy to deal with all cases of sickness the most effectual way that can be devised. No one can assent truthfully that we are doing so at present.To sum up the imperfections of the present arrangements, we may say : No provision is trade for many infectious diseases. No provision is made for consumptives. No provision is made for Mental Cases. No provision is made for Alcoholic Cases. No provision is made for Epilepsy. Acute and Chronic and Convalescent cases treated in the same wards. No provision is made for very young children. The general principle enumerated above—that a Primary and a Secondary Hospital are required—is not new. It has been successfully carried out in New York and other American cities, in the field during war, and is obviously destined to govern the work all great hospitals everywhere in the future.———Since the above was written, Dunedin has been supplied with a Hospital for Infectious Diseases and a Sanatorium for cases of Early Consumption. The other conditions are unaltered.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

Third part of an article by Dr Colquhoun, Dunedin, published in NZMJ 1910;9(36):33-37. Continued from part 2 at http://www.nzma.org.nz/journal/124-1328/4523Such an institution [secondary hospital] would take in all those cases which are now disadvantageously placed at the Benevolent, and many which are left to die miserably in unsuitable homes. It would be at once a humane home for incurables and a convalescent station. In its grounds it could accommodate the few infectious cases which from time to time arise in Dunedin, and also the more frequently occurring cases of tuberculosis. Dunedin is fortunate in having in its immediate neighbourhood land suited for this purpose which can be obtained at a moderate figure.It is well known than the late Dr. McGregor, Inspector of Hospitals, was always opposed to continuing the Hospital on its present site. He held that the site was swampy, dusty, and contracted in extent and unsuited for an expanding institution. On the other hand it was contended that the true place for a Hospital is where it is most wanted, and that the present site, however objectionable from hygienic reasons, was the only possible one for supplying the wants of the city. Both views were reasonable, and both would be met by the recognition of the fact that a city Hospital should consist of two departments—a Primary and a Secondary. The Primary Hospital, besides providing accommodation and treatment for acute cases, would still retain the out-patient department.Another much-needed reform which would be made possible would be the establishment of an observation ward for mental cases. At present suspected lunatics are sent either to gaol or to the Magistrate's Court for examination. These are humiliations which the State has no right to inflict on the honest poor. We might as well send a consumptive patient to prison as treat by the methods of the criminal court those unfortunates whose disease happens to be in their brain cells. Their proper place, until duly certified as insane, is in the public hospital.It may be objected to these proposals that they will cost money. Certainly they will, but not as much as the present system. It is in the long run the truest and best economy to deal with all cases of sickness the most effectual way that can be devised. No one can assent truthfully that we are doing so at present.To sum up the imperfections of the present arrangements, we may say : No provision is trade for many infectious diseases. No provision is made for consumptives. No provision is made for Mental Cases. No provision is made for Alcoholic Cases. No provision is made for Epilepsy. Acute and Chronic and Convalescent cases treated in the same wards. No provision is made for very young children. The general principle enumerated above—that a Primary and a Secondary Hospital are required—is not new. It has been successfully carried out in New York and other American cities, in the field during war, and is obviously destined to govern the work all great hospitals everywhere in the future.———Since the above was written, Dunedin has been supplied with a Hospital for Infectious Diseases and a Sanatorium for cases of Early Consumption. The other conditions are unaltered.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

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