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Pacific health is the theme of this edition of the Journal; it sends a positive signal for the need to highlight the importance of research priorities, capacity and capabilities, and leadership in the Pacific populations in New Zealand.1 It is also pleasing to see the research community showing their generous support. The Pacific people in New Zealand, however, continue to display relatively poor health outcomes despite these targeted programmes and focussed interventions. The Pacific peoples in New Zealand (mostly comprising those of Samoan, Tongan, Niuean, or Cook Islands descent) is a diverse, complex community with multiple ethnicities, cultures and aspirations.2 Unfortunately this ethnic complexity is seldom factored into the mixture of policy and funding initiatives designed to effect the desired outcomes. But in supporting Pacific research we will gain a better understanding of this priority population in order to facilitate the opportunities to improve their health outcomes and lead their communities out of the poverty indices. Research and teaching institutions are allocated public resources to invest in the development of Pacific capabilities in research and education. Most institutions have implemented these strategies to varying degrees; unfortunately, however, the governing bodies remain ambivalent around the perceived risk in being seen to favour a priority population over others thus inconsistencies are seen with their fluctuating levels of investment.3 Increasingly, as the frustrations continue with current investment strategies, it might be time to consider supporting legislative measures so there is a consistent approach without the risk of the idiosyncrasies that impacts with the personnel changes of the governance and management structures at all levels. Indeed, the Crown and its agencies need to be consistent and avoid the cyclical dismantling and rebuilding of the Pacific teams in government which adds to the instability and inconsistency in supporting Pacific initiatives. Organisations appear not to recognise that the lowest common denominator need the most help for the collective to have equal access to all the opportunities available.3 We all agree that it is vitally important to support our best and brightest at the same time it is also important to support the development, celebrate the achievements and innovation of the Pacific people to reduce their burden on society and prosper. The more unequivocal statement, which leaves no doubt in the investment strategy for Pacific families, is the announcement by the Honourable Tariana Turia MP on the mechanism of a single Whanau Ora commissioning agency for all the Pacific families.4 This will provide opportunities to enhance the research capacity and leadership, develop a monitoring and evaluation framework, be innovative, improve health outcomes and add value to the New Zealand economy. Pacific people want to participate and contribute to the health and wellbeing agenda using research as one of the tools to add value. I commend the NZMJ Editorial Board for their leadership and investment in focusing this edition of the Journal on Pacific health research.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Kiki Maoate, Paediatric Surgeon and Urologist, University of Otago and Christchurch Hospital, Christchurch

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Mr Kiki Maoate, Department of Paediatric Surgery, Christchurch Hospital, PO Box 4345, Christchurch, New Zealand

Correspondence Email

Kiki.Maoate@cdhb.health.nz

Competing Interests

None identified.

- Ala Moui: Pathways to Pacific Health and Wellbeing 2010-2014. Best health outcomes for Pacific Peoples - Medical Council of New Zealand. http://www.mcnz.org.nz/assets/News-and-Publications/Statements/Best-health-outcomes-for-Pacific-Peoples.pdf Health Research Council NZ: Pacific Health Strategic Plan 2006-2010. Whanau ora model of governance announced. http://www.tpk.govt.nz/_documents/rfp-whanau-ora-commissioning-agency-for-pacific-families.pdf-

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

Pacific health is the theme of this edition of the Journal; it sends a positive signal for the need to highlight the importance of research priorities, capacity and capabilities, and leadership in the Pacific populations in New Zealand.1 It is also pleasing to see the research community showing their generous support. The Pacific people in New Zealand, however, continue to display relatively poor health outcomes despite these targeted programmes and focussed interventions. The Pacific peoples in New Zealand (mostly comprising those of Samoan, Tongan, Niuean, or Cook Islands descent) is a diverse, complex community with multiple ethnicities, cultures and aspirations.2 Unfortunately this ethnic complexity is seldom factored into the mixture of policy and funding initiatives designed to effect the desired outcomes. But in supporting Pacific research we will gain a better understanding of this priority population in order to facilitate the opportunities to improve their health outcomes and lead their communities out of the poverty indices. Research and teaching institutions are allocated public resources to invest in the development of Pacific capabilities in research and education. Most institutions have implemented these strategies to varying degrees; unfortunately, however, the governing bodies remain ambivalent around the perceived risk in being seen to favour a priority population over others thus inconsistencies are seen with their fluctuating levels of investment.3 Increasingly, as the frustrations continue with current investment strategies, it might be time to consider supporting legislative measures so there is a consistent approach without the risk of the idiosyncrasies that impacts with the personnel changes of the governance and management structures at all levels. Indeed, the Crown and its agencies need to be consistent and avoid the cyclical dismantling and rebuilding of the Pacific teams in government which adds to the instability and inconsistency in supporting Pacific initiatives. Organisations appear not to recognise that the lowest common denominator need the most help for the collective to have equal access to all the opportunities available.3 We all agree that it is vitally important to support our best and brightest at the same time it is also important to support the development, celebrate the achievements and innovation of the Pacific people to reduce their burden on society and prosper. The more unequivocal statement, which leaves no doubt in the investment strategy for Pacific families, is the announcement by the Honourable Tariana Turia MP on the mechanism of a single Whanau Ora commissioning agency for all the Pacific families.4 This will provide opportunities to enhance the research capacity and leadership, develop a monitoring and evaluation framework, be innovative, improve health outcomes and add value to the New Zealand economy. Pacific people want to participate and contribute to the health and wellbeing agenda using research as one of the tools to add value. I commend the NZMJ Editorial Board for their leadership and investment in focusing this edition of the Journal on Pacific health research.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Kiki Maoate, Paediatric Surgeon and Urologist, University of Otago and Christchurch Hospital, Christchurch

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Mr Kiki Maoate, Department of Paediatric Surgery, Christchurch Hospital, PO Box 4345, Christchurch, New Zealand

Correspondence Email

Kiki.Maoate@cdhb.health.nz

Competing Interests

None identified.

- Ala Moui: Pathways to Pacific Health and Wellbeing 2010-2014. Best health outcomes for Pacific Peoples - Medical Council of New Zealand. http://www.mcnz.org.nz/assets/News-and-Publications/Statements/Best-health-outcomes-for-Pacific-Peoples.pdf Health Research Council NZ: Pacific Health Strategic Plan 2006-2010. Whanau ora model of governance announced. http://www.tpk.govt.nz/_documents/rfp-whanau-ora-commissioning-agency-for-pacific-families.pdf-

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

Pacific health is the theme of this edition of the Journal; it sends a positive signal for the need to highlight the importance of research priorities, capacity and capabilities, and leadership in the Pacific populations in New Zealand.1 It is also pleasing to see the research community showing their generous support. The Pacific people in New Zealand, however, continue to display relatively poor health outcomes despite these targeted programmes and focussed interventions. The Pacific peoples in New Zealand (mostly comprising those of Samoan, Tongan, Niuean, or Cook Islands descent) is a diverse, complex community with multiple ethnicities, cultures and aspirations.2 Unfortunately this ethnic complexity is seldom factored into the mixture of policy and funding initiatives designed to effect the desired outcomes. But in supporting Pacific research we will gain a better understanding of this priority population in order to facilitate the opportunities to improve their health outcomes and lead their communities out of the poverty indices. Research and teaching institutions are allocated public resources to invest in the development of Pacific capabilities in research and education. Most institutions have implemented these strategies to varying degrees; unfortunately, however, the governing bodies remain ambivalent around the perceived risk in being seen to favour a priority population over others thus inconsistencies are seen with their fluctuating levels of investment.3 Increasingly, as the frustrations continue with current investment strategies, it might be time to consider supporting legislative measures so there is a consistent approach without the risk of the idiosyncrasies that impacts with the personnel changes of the governance and management structures at all levels. Indeed, the Crown and its agencies need to be consistent and avoid the cyclical dismantling and rebuilding of the Pacific teams in government which adds to the instability and inconsistency in supporting Pacific initiatives. Organisations appear not to recognise that the lowest common denominator need the most help for the collective to have equal access to all the opportunities available.3 We all agree that it is vitally important to support our best and brightest at the same time it is also important to support the development, celebrate the achievements and innovation of the Pacific people to reduce their burden on society and prosper. The more unequivocal statement, which leaves no doubt in the investment strategy for Pacific families, is the announcement by the Honourable Tariana Turia MP on the mechanism of a single Whanau Ora commissioning agency for all the Pacific families.4 This will provide opportunities to enhance the research capacity and leadership, develop a monitoring and evaluation framework, be innovative, improve health outcomes and add value to the New Zealand economy. Pacific people want to participate and contribute to the health and wellbeing agenda using research as one of the tools to add value. I commend the NZMJ Editorial Board for their leadership and investment in focusing this edition of the Journal on Pacific health research.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Kiki Maoate, Paediatric Surgeon and Urologist, University of Otago and Christchurch Hospital, Christchurch

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Mr Kiki Maoate, Department of Paediatric Surgery, Christchurch Hospital, PO Box 4345, Christchurch, New Zealand

Correspondence Email

Kiki.Maoate@cdhb.health.nz

Competing Interests

None identified.

- Ala Moui: Pathways to Pacific Health and Wellbeing 2010-2014. Best health outcomes for Pacific Peoples - Medical Council of New Zealand. http://www.mcnz.org.nz/assets/News-and-Publications/Statements/Best-health-outcomes-for-Pacific-Peoples.pdf Health Research Council NZ: Pacific Health Strategic Plan 2006-2010. Whanau ora model of governance announced. http://www.tpk.govt.nz/_documents/rfp-whanau-ora-commissioning-agency-for-pacific-families.pdf-

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