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Potential hazards of commercial ultrasound in pregnancyUltrasound (US) in pregnancy has an excellent safety record when used in the health-care setting. However, the use of US in the commercial setting is causing some concern to the Food & Drug Administration (FDA) in the USA.The FDA has recently warned of the potential dangers of commercial US in pregnancy. In this context the fetus may be exposed to US for as long as one hour. It is known that US imaging introduces energy into the body. Physical effects in tissue such as pressure oscillations, rises in temperature and in some circumstances the creation of small pockets of gas in bodily fluids or tissues have been noted in laboratory studies. None of these would be welcome. In addition, commercial US might cause anxiety for the consumer if images, videos, or monitor readings are misinterpreted by them or an untrained provider.Lancet 2015;385:2. Screening the newborn for rare but treatable conditionsDiagnosing a rare serious condition before it is symptomatic enables appropriate early treatment which may be life changing. Newborns in the UK have routinely been screened for phenylketonuria, congenital hypothyroidism, sickle cell disease, cystic fibrosis, and medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency.As of Jan 5, 2015, the UK National Health Service's Newborn Blood Spot Screening Programme will now screen for nine diseases by including an additional four rare genetic diseases: maple syrup urine disease (MSUD), isovaleric acidaemia (IVA), glutaric aciduria type 1 (GA1), and homocystinuria (pyridoxine unresponsive; HCU).Very good news for those who inherit these rare but potentially treatable conditions.Lancet 2015;385:90. Progesterone for acute traumatic brain injuryTraumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability worldwide. Progesterone has been shown to improve neurologic outcome in multiple experimental models and two early-phase trials involving patients with TBI.This report concerns a double-blind, multicentre clinical trial in which patients with severe, moderate-to-severe, or moderate acute TBI were randomised to receive intravenous progesterone or placebo within 4 hours after their injury. 882 patients were randomised before the trial was stopped for futility with respect to the primary outcome. The researchers found no significant difference between the progesterone and placebo cohorts in terms of a favourable neurological outcome.The researchers conclude that their clinical trial did not show a benefit of progesterone over placebo in the improvement of outcomes in patients with acute TBI.N Engl J Med 2014;371:2457–66.

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Potential hazards of commercial ultrasound in pregnancyUltrasound (US) in pregnancy has an excellent safety record when used in the health-care setting. However, the use of US in the commercial setting is causing some concern to the Food & Drug Administration (FDA) in the USA.The FDA has recently warned of the potential dangers of commercial US in pregnancy. In this context the fetus may be exposed to US for as long as one hour. It is known that US imaging introduces energy into the body. Physical effects in tissue such as pressure oscillations, rises in temperature and in some circumstances the creation of small pockets of gas in bodily fluids or tissues have been noted in laboratory studies. None of these would be welcome. In addition, commercial US might cause anxiety for the consumer if images, videos, or monitor readings are misinterpreted by them or an untrained provider.Lancet 2015;385:2. Screening the newborn for rare but treatable conditionsDiagnosing a rare serious condition before it is symptomatic enables appropriate early treatment which may be life changing. Newborns in the UK have routinely been screened for phenylketonuria, congenital hypothyroidism, sickle cell disease, cystic fibrosis, and medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency.As of Jan 5, 2015, the UK National Health Service's Newborn Blood Spot Screening Programme will now screen for nine diseases by including an additional four rare genetic diseases: maple syrup urine disease (MSUD), isovaleric acidaemia (IVA), glutaric aciduria type 1 (GA1), and homocystinuria (pyridoxine unresponsive; HCU).Very good news for those who inherit these rare but potentially treatable conditions.Lancet 2015;385:90. Progesterone for acute traumatic brain injuryTraumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability worldwide. Progesterone has been shown to improve neurologic outcome in multiple experimental models and two early-phase trials involving patients with TBI.This report concerns a double-blind, multicentre clinical trial in which patients with severe, moderate-to-severe, or moderate acute TBI were randomised to receive intravenous progesterone or placebo within 4 hours after their injury. 882 patients were randomised before the trial was stopped for futility with respect to the primary outcome. The researchers found no significant difference between the progesterone and placebo cohorts in terms of a favourable neurological outcome.The researchers conclude that their clinical trial did not show a benefit of progesterone over placebo in the improvement of outcomes in patients with acute TBI.N Engl J Med 2014;371:2457–66.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

Potential hazards of commercial ultrasound in pregnancyUltrasound (US) in pregnancy has an excellent safety record when used in the health-care setting. However, the use of US in the commercial setting is causing some concern to the Food & Drug Administration (FDA) in the USA.The FDA has recently warned of the potential dangers of commercial US in pregnancy. In this context the fetus may be exposed to US for as long as one hour. It is known that US imaging introduces energy into the body. Physical effects in tissue such as pressure oscillations, rises in temperature and in some circumstances the creation of small pockets of gas in bodily fluids or tissues have been noted in laboratory studies. None of these would be welcome. In addition, commercial US might cause anxiety for the consumer if images, videos, or monitor readings are misinterpreted by them or an untrained provider.Lancet 2015;385:2. Screening the newborn for rare but treatable conditionsDiagnosing a rare serious condition before it is symptomatic enables appropriate early treatment which may be life changing. Newborns in the UK have routinely been screened for phenylketonuria, congenital hypothyroidism, sickle cell disease, cystic fibrosis, and medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency.As of Jan 5, 2015, the UK National Health Service's Newborn Blood Spot Screening Programme will now screen for nine diseases by including an additional four rare genetic diseases: maple syrup urine disease (MSUD), isovaleric acidaemia (IVA), glutaric aciduria type 1 (GA1), and homocystinuria (pyridoxine unresponsive; HCU).Very good news for those who inherit these rare but potentially treatable conditions.Lancet 2015;385:90. Progesterone for acute traumatic brain injuryTraumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability worldwide. Progesterone has been shown to improve neurologic outcome in multiple experimental models and two early-phase trials involving patients with TBI.This report concerns a double-blind, multicentre clinical trial in which patients with severe, moderate-to-severe, or moderate acute TBI were randomised to receive intravenous progesterone or placebo within 4 hours after their injury. 882 patients were randomised before the trial was stopped for futility with respect to the primary outcome. The researchers found no significant difference between the progesterone and placebo cohorts in terms of a favourable neurological outcome.The researchers conclude that their clinical trial did not show a benefit of progesterone over placebo in the improvement of outcomes in patients with acute TBI.N Engl J Med 2014;371:2457–66.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
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