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April 1920

Dr. Irving (the retiring President) said the profession was accustomed to look on Dunedin as the seat of medical learning, and he congratulated the Otago Division on the number of members it had attracted here. One could not help feeling saddened when one remembered how many old friends would be there no more. It might be invidious to mention names, but he could not help thinking that that grand old veteran, Dr. Batchelor, would have been glad to have been there that night. They might be thankful that so many of the profession had made good and come back to them again. Dr. Colquhoun, who had done so much for the medical profession in New Zealand, was, unfortunately, unable to accept the presidency at the last moment, but his place had been filled by Dr. Ferguson. Dr. Ferguson needed no introduction from him. Anyone who had worked with him knew that he had the welfare of the profession and of the association very much at heart. (Applause.) One of the most important things on the Conference paper was the suggested establishment of a State medical service. Dr. Ferguson, as Dean of the Medical School, looked at the question, he thought, rather differently from those who had graduated many years ago, and he thought it was good that Dr. Ferguson would preside, because he would look at it more from the point of view of the man who was just getting through.

Dr. Ferguson, who was received with applause, remarked that there had been no meeting of the Association in Dunedin for 13 years, and that he was Chairman of the last meeting of the old Association, held in 1896, at which arrangements were made by which they became voluntarily merged in the British Medical Association. It had been his ambition to be the first President of the new Association, but delays and difficulties resulted in the final formation of the Association not being effected till the following year, when another became President. This meeting was important in that it was the first since the war, and war had made an enormous difference to medical work and standards. Things would never be the same again as before the war. In surgery, in medicine, in public health, more strides had been made in four years of war than in 40 years of peace, because extensive experiments and scientific research had been carried out under the stress of great emergency, and with the whole financial resources of the associated Powers behind it. Governments were realising that it paid to spend money in research. ln sanitation our knowledge of public health had increased in leaps and bounds, from the way in which medical men learnt to deal with epidemics in camps. In no war had there been such a small loss from sickness as in the great war now fortunately ended. Never before had there not been greater fatality from sickness than from bullets. If there was one thing he would say they had to learn, it was the value of team work. A single man could not do what a body of men could accomplish.

At the outbreak of war we had an organised territorial force, but practically no organisation for the Medical Corps, and so had to depend upon the civilian men to do it for us. The organisation grew up in the face of great difficulties, and the men responsible for it deserved credit for their work. The civilian medical practitioners who volunteered for service also deserved the gratitude of the community. No doubt mistakes had been made, but the work of the New Zealand Medical Corps was very highly spoken of by those in a position to judge. The Dental Department had earned a name that put in the shade the name of any other department of the forces involved. It was the first time the Dental Association had been associated with their Conference, and he thought it was an innovation of which they might be proud. Referring to the outbreak of the war, Dr. Ferguson, as Dean of the Medical School, said that his teachers then all wanted to shut the school and go to the front. His students, too, were being taken by the Minister of Defence. General Henderson deserved great credit and gratitude for the stand he had taken in the matter. He had come down when the students were rampant for war, and pacified them by showing that they would be of more value as medical men to heal wounds than if they went out and tried to inflict them. The result was that they had completely educated over 160 men who they were able to send forward. Touching on the effect of conscription on the profession and the assistance rendered by the British Medical Association in that respect. the speaker said that owing to the tact and consideration shown by General Henderson the scheme worked well, and they were able to send 400 men and yet keep up the work at home. The public and Government were recognising the value of team work, “and as sure as the sun rises tomorrow,” said Dr. Ferguson, “we are going to have a State medical service. We have got to face the fact of a State medical service. On the result of your deliberations this week will largely depend what form that medical service will take. If it takes such a form that the profession has a voice in the direction of its future, things will go on all right; but if it is forced on the profession against its will, it will assuredly mean disaster for everyone.” He concluded by expressing the hope that beneficial results would follow the Conference.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

April 1920

Dr. Irving (the retiring President) said the profession was accustomed to look on Dunedin as the seat of medical learning, and he congratulated the Otago Division on the number of members it had attracted here. One could not help feeling saddened when one remembered how many old friends would be there no more. It might be invidious to mention names, but he could not help thinking that that grand old veteran, Dr. Batchelor, would have been glad to have been there that night. They might be thankful that so many of the profession had made good and come back to them again. Dr. Colquhoun, who had done so much for the medical profession in New Zealand, was, unfortunately, unable to accept the presidency at the last moment, but his place had been filled by Dr. Ferguson. Dr. Ferguson needed no introduction from him. Anyone who had worked with him knew that he had the welfare of the profession and of the association very much at heart. (Applause.) One of the most important things on the Conference paper was the suggested establishment of a State medical service. Dr. Ferguson, as Dean of the Medical School, looked at the question, he thought, rather differently from those who had graduated many years ago, and he thought it was good that Dr. Ferguson would preside, because he would look at it more from the point of view of the man who was just getting through.

Dr. Ferguson, who was received with applause, remarked that there had been no meeting of the Association in Dunedin for 13 years, and that he was Chairman of the last meeting of the old Association, held in 1896, at which arrangements were made by which they became voluntarily merged in the British Medical Association. It had been his ambition to be the first President of the new Association, but delays and difficulties resulted in the final formation of the Association not being effected till the following year, when another became President. This meeting was important in that it was the first since the war, and war had made an enormous difference to medical work and standards. Things would never be the same again as before the war. In surgery, in medicine, in public health, more strides had been made in four years of war than in 40 years of peace, because extensive experiments and scientific research had been carried out under the stress of great emergency, and with the whole financial resources of the associated Powers behind it. Governments were realising that it paid to spend money in research. ln sanitation our knowledge of public health had increased in leaps and bounds, from the way in which medical men learnt to deal with epidemics in camps. In no war had there been such a small loss from sickness as in the great war now fortunately ended. Never before had there not been greater fatality from sickness than from bullets. If there was one thing he would say they had to learn, it was the value of team work. A single man could not do what a body of men could accomplish.

At the outbreak of war we had an organised territorial force, but practically no organisation for the Medical Corps, and so had to depend upon the civilian men to do it for us. The organisation grew up in the face of great difficulties, and the men responsible for it deserved credit for their work. The civilian medical practitioners who volunteered for service also deserved the gratitude of the community. No doubt mistakes had been made, but the work of the New Zealand Medical Corps was very highly spoken of by those in a position to judge. The Dental Department had earned a name that put in the shade the name of any other department of the forces involved. It was the first time the Dental Association had been associated with their Conference, and he thought it was an innovation of which they might be proud. Referring to the outbreak of the war, Dr. Ferguson, as Dean of the Medical School, said that his teachers then all wanted to shut the school and go to the front. His students, too, were being taken by the Minister of Defence. General Henderson deserved great credit and gratitude for the stand he had taken in the matter. He had come down when the students were rampant for war, and pacified them by showing that they would be of more value as medical men to heal wounds than if they went out and tried to inflict them. The result was that they had completely educated over 160 men who they were able to send forward. Touching on the effect of conscription on the profession and the assistance rendered by the British Medical Association in that respect. the speaker said that owing to the tact and consideration shown by General Henderson the scheme worked well, and they were able to send 400 men and yet keep up the work at home. The public and Government were recognising the value of team work, “and as sure as the sun rises tomorrow,” said Dr. Ferguson, “we are going to have a State medical service. We have got to face the fact of a State medical service. On the result of your deliberations this week will largely depend what form that medical service will take. If it takes such a form that the profession has a voice in the direction of its future, things will go on all right; but if it is forced on the profession against its will, it will assuredly mean disaster for everyone.” He concluded by expressing the hope that beneficial results would follow the Conference.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

April 1920

Dr. Irving (the retiring President) said the profession was accustomed to look on Dunedin as the seat of medical learning, and he congratulated the Otago Division on the number of members it had attracted here. One could not help feeling saddened when one remembered how many old friends would be there no more. It might be invidious to mention names, but he could not help thinking that that grand old veteran, Dr. Batchelor, would have been glad to have been there that night. They might be thankful that so many of the profession had made good and come back to them again. Dr. Colquhoun, who had done so much for the medical profession in New Zealand, was, unfortunately, unable to accept the presidency at the last moment, but his place had been filled by Dr. Ferguson. Dr. Ferguson needed no introduction from him. Anyone who had worked with him knew that he had the welfare of the profession and of the association very much at heart. (Applause.) One of the most important things on the Conference paper was the suggested establishment of a State medical service. Dr. Ferguson, as Dean of the Medical School, looked at the question, he thought, rather differently from those who had graduated many years ago, and he thought it was good that Dr. Ferguson would preside, because he would look at it more from the point of view of the man who was just getting through.

Dr. Ferguson, who was received with applause, remarked that there had been no meeting of the Association in Dunedin for 13 years, and that he was Chairman of the last meeting of the old Association, held in 1896, at which arrangements were made by which they became voluntarily merged in the British Medical Association. It had been his ambition to be the first President of the new Association, but delays and difficulties resulted in the final formation of the Association not being effected till the following year, when another became President. This meeting was important in that it was the first since the war, and war had made an enormous difference to medical work and standards. Things would never be the same again as before the war. In surgery, in medicine, in public health, more strides had been made in four years of war than in 40 years of peace, because extensive experiments and scientific research had been carried out under the stress of great emergency, and with the whole financial resources of the associated Powers behind it. Governments were realising that it paid to spend money in research. ln sanitation our knowledge of public health had increased in leaps and bounds, from the way in which medical men learnt to deal with epidemics in camps. In no war had there been such a small loss from sickness as in the great war now fortunately ended. Never before had there not been greater fatality from sickness than from bullets. If there was one thing he would say they had to learn, it was the value of team work. A single man could not do what a body of men could accomplish.

At the outbreak of war we had an organised territorial force, but practically no organisation for the Medical Corps, and so had to depend upon the civilian men to do it for us. The organisation grew up in the face of great difficulties, and the men responsible for it deserved credit for their work. The civilian medical practitioners who volunteered for service also deserved the gratitude of the community. No doubt mistakes had been made, but the work of the New Zealand Medical Corps was very highly spoken of by those in a position to judge. The Dental Department had earned a name that put in the shade the name of any other department of the forces involved. It was the first time the Dental Association had been associated with their Conference, and he thought it was an innovation of which they might be proud. Referring to the outbreak of the war, Dr. Ferguson, as Dean of the Medical School, said that his teachers then all wanted to shut the school and go to the front. His students, too, were being taken by the Minister of Defence. General Henderson deserved great credit and gratitude for the stand he had taken in the matter. He had come down when the students were rampant for war, and pacified them by showing that they would be of more value as medical men to heal wounds than if they went out and tried to inflict them. The result was that they had completely educated over 160 men who they were able to send forward. Touching on the effect of conscription on the profession and the assistance rendered by the British Medical Association in that respect. the speaker said that owing to the tact and consideration shown by General Henderson the scheme worked well, and they were able to send 400 men and yet keep up the work at home. The public and Government were recognising the value of team work, “and as sure as the sun rises tomorrow,” said Dr. Ferguson, “we are going to have a State medical service. We have got to face the fact of a State medical service. On the result of your deliberations this week will largely depend what form that medical service will take. If it takes such a form that the profession has a voice in the direction of its future, things will go on all right; but if it is forced on the profession against its will, it will assuredly mean disaster for everyone.” He concluded by expressing the hope that beneficial results would follow the Conference.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

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