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I compliment Lanit Anand and Christopher Sealey on their most interesting paper and agree with their conclusion that titanium is a very well-tolerated material for orbital reconstruction. I note that commercially available plates or cut-to-fit mesh were used in their study. I first used custom-made titanium plates in 20031–3 and they are now used for the vast majority of patients having orbital reconstruction in the regional oral and maxillofacial unit in Swansea, Wales. Bespoke titanium plates decrease theatre time and facilitate accurate reconstruction. Now that the technology to make 3D models from CT scans is more widely available, I was wondering if the authors are considering moving on to use custom-made plates in the future?

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

- Prue Baxter, Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon, Singleton Hospital Swansea, United Kingdom.-

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Dr Prue Baxter, Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon, Singleton Hospital Swansea, United Kingdom.

Correspondence Email

pruebaxter@doctors.org.uk

Competing Interests

Nil.

  1. Baxter P. Custom made titanium plates in orbital reconstruction. Oral presentation. Australia and New Zealand Association of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Christchurch. 28–31 October 2008.
  2. Mustafa S, Evans P, Bocca A, Patton D, Sugar A, Baxter P. Customised titanium reconstruction of post-traumatic orbital wall defects: a review of 22 cases. International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 2011; 40:1357–1362.
  3. Baxter P. Titanium Implants for Post-traumatic Orbital Reconstruction. Oral presentation. Controversial topics in orbital trauma Royal Society of Medicine, London 11 May 2017.

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

I compliment Lanit Anand and Christopher Sealey on their most interesting paper and agree with their conclusion that titanium is a very well-tolerated material for orbital reconstruction. I note that commercially available plates or cut-to-fit mesh were used in their study. I first used custom-made titanium plates in 20031–3 and they are now used for the vast majority of patients having orbital reconstruction in the regional oral and maxillofacial unit in Swansea, Wales. Bespoke titanium plates decrease theatre time and facilitate accurate reconstruction. Now that the technology to make 3D models from CT scans is more widely available, I was wondering if the authors are considering moving on to use custom-made plates in the future?

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

- Prue Baxter, Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon, Singleton Hospital Swansea, United Kingdom.-

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Dr Prue Baxter, Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon, Singleton Hospital Swansea, United Kingdom.

Correspondence Email

pruebaxter@doctors.org.uk

Competing Interests

Nil.

  1. Baxter P. Custom made titanium plates in orbital reconstruction. Oral presentation. Australia and New Zealand Association of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Christchurch. 28–31 October 2008.
  2. Mustafa S, Evans P, Bocca A, Patton D, Sugar A, Baxter P. Customised titanium reconstruction of post-traumatic orbital wall defects: a review of 22 cases. International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 2011; 40:1357–1362.
  3. Baxter P. Titanium Implants for Post-traumatic Orbital Reconstruction. Oral presentation. Controversial topics in orbital trauma Royal Society of Medicine, London 11 May 2017.

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

I compliment Lanit Anand and Christopher Sealey on their most interesting paper and agree with their conclusion that titanium is a very well-tolerated material for orbital reconstruction. I note that commercially available plates or cut-to-fit mesh were used in their study. I first used custom-made titanium plates in 20031–3 and they are now used for the vast majority of patients having orbital reconstruction in the regional oral and maxillofacial unit in Swansea, Wales. Bespoke titanium plates decrease theatre time and facilitate accurate reconstruction. Now that the technology to make 3D models from CT scans is more widely available, I was wondering if the authors are considering moving on to use custom-made plates in the future?

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

- Prue Baxter, Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon, Singleton Hospital Swansea, United Kingdom.-

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Dr Prue Baxter, Consultant Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon, Singleton Hospital Swansea, United Kingdom.

Correspondence Email

pruebaxter@doctors.org.uk

Competing Interests

Nil.

  1. Baxter P. Custom made titanium plates in orbital reconstruction. Oral presentation. Australia and New Zealand Association of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Christchurch. 28–31 October 2008.
  2. Mustafa S, Evans P, Bocca A, Patton D, Sugar A, Baxter P. Customised titanium reconstruction of post-traumatic orbital wall defects: a review of 22 cases. International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 2011; 40:1357–1362.
  3. Baxter P. Titanium Implants for Post-traumatic Orbital Reconstruction. Oral presentation. Controversial topics in orbital trauma Royal Society of Medicine, London 11 May 2017.

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

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