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1921

During the year, 1921, a total of 1,365 schools were visited, and the result of the examination (partial or complete) of 78,980 children recorded. Of those who were examined in the routine way an average of 79 per cent. was returned as having physical or mental defect of some kind. In interpreting this percentage it should be understood that under the heading of “dental decay” are recorded only those cases with carious permanent teeth, or more than three carious temporary teeth—i.e., an average of 54.6 per cent. for all districts. The number of children with perfect sets of teeth is probably not more than 2 or 3 per cent.

During the past year effort was concentrated particularly upon the routine examination of the entrant and primer classes, to which the following figures largely refer. Some of the percentages of defect are therefore not so high as those obtained in previous years, when Standard II. was examined for statistical purposes.

Impaired nutrition was found present in 7.25 per cent. I should emphasize that these figures represent only such cases as are not referable to any other heading. For instance, deformity of the chest and dental caries are well-recognised indications of faulty nutrition. Others, again, are included under less definite headings, such as “anæmia” and “suspected tuberculosis.”

Deformity of trunk and chest was found present in 23.8 per cent. This figure includes not only cases of such definite deformity as pigeon-breast, spinal curvation, and so on, but also cases of faulty posture associated with round shoulders and flat chest. These habitual faults of posture, unless corrected, develop in time into fixed deformities. It is for this type especially that the “corrective class” with its special physical exercises is devised.

Defective vision was detected in 4 per cent. of the examined. This figure is probably below that of the actual defect existing, as the test was applied by some officers only where defect was suspected. The result of previous examination of children in Standard II. gives 10 per cent. suffering from defective vision.

Obstructed breathing occurs to some extent in 19.0 per cent. of children, in the following proportions: Adenoids, 2.8 per cent.; enlarged tonsils, 13.4 per cent.; adenoids and enlarged tonsils, 2.8 per cent. Many of these cases show obstructed breathing to slight degree, and, by well-regulated breathing-exercises and physical drill, improve without operation. (Extract from Report, 1921, of the Director, Division of School Hygiene.)

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

1921

During the year, 1921, a total of 1,365 schools were visited, and the result of the examination (partial or complete) of 78,980 children recorded. Of those who were examined in the routine way an average of 79 per cent. was returned as having physical or mental defect of some kind. In interpreting this percentage it should be understood that under the heading of “dental decay” are recorded only those cases with carious permanent teeth, or more than three carious temporary teeth—i.e., an average of 54.6 per cent. for all districts. The number of children with perfect sets of teeth is probably not more than 2 or 3 per cent.

During the past year effort was concentrated particularly upon the routine examination of the entrant and primer classes, to which the following figures largely refer. Some of the percentages of defect are therefore not so high as those obtained in previous years, when Standard II. was examined for statistical purposes.

Impaired nutrition was found present in 7.25 per cent. I should emphasize that these figures represent only such cases as are not referable to any other heading. For instance, deformity of the chest and dental caries are well-recognised indications of faulty nutrition. Others, again, are included under less definite headings, such as “anæmia” and “suspected tuberculosis.”

Deformity of trunk and chest was found present in 23.8 per cent. This figure includes not only cases of such definite deformity as pigeon-breast, spinal curvation, and so on, but also cases of faulty posture associated with round shoulders and flat chest. These habitual faults of posture, unless corrected, develop in time into fixed deformities. It is for this type especially that the “corrective class” with its special physical exercises is devised.

Defective vision was detected in 4 per cent. of the examined. This figure is probably below that of the actual defect existing, as the test was applied by some officers only where defect was suspected. The result of previous examination of children in Standard II. gives 10 per cent. suffering from defective vision.

Obstructed breathing occurs to some extent in 19.0 per cent. of children, in the following proportions: Adenoids, 2.8 per cent.; enlarged tonsils, 13.4 per cent.; adenoids and enlarged tonsils, 2.8 per cent. Many of these cases show obstructed breathing to slight degree, and, by well-regulated breathing-exercises and physical drill, improve without operation. (Extract from Report, 1921, of the Director, Division of School Hygiene.)

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

1921

During the year, 1921, a total of 1,365 schools were visited, and the result of the examination (partial or complete) of 78,980 children recorded. Of those who were examined in the routine way an average of 79 per cent. was returned as having physical or mental defect of some kind. In interpreting this percentage it should be understood that under the heading of “dental decay” are recorded only those cases with carious permanent teeth, or more than three carious temporary teeth—i.e., an average of 54.6 per cent. for all districts. The number of children with perfect sets of teeth is probably not more than 2 or 3 per cent.

During the past year effort was concentrated particularly upon the routine examination of the entrant and primer classes, to which the following figures largely refer. Some of the percentages of defect are therefore not so high as those obtained in previous years, when Standard II. was examined for statistical purposes.

Impaired nutrition was found present in 7.25 per cent. I should emphasize that these figures represent only such cases as are not referable to any other heading. For instance, deformity of the chest and dental caries are well-recognised indications of faulty nutrition. Others, again, are included under less definite headings, such as “anæmia” and “suspected tuberculosis.”

Deformity of trunk and chest was found present in 23.8 per cent. This figure includes not only cases of such definite deformity as pigeon-breast, spinal curvation, and so on, but also cases of faulty posture associated with round shoulders and flat chest. These habitual faults of posture, unless corrected, develop in time into fixed deformities. It is for this type especially that the “corrective class” with its special physical exercises is devised.

Defective vision was detected in 4 per cent. of the examined. This figure is probably below that of the actual defect existing, as the test was applied by some officers only where defect was suspected. The result of previous examination of children in Standard II. gives 10 per cent. suffering from defective vision.

Obstructed breathing occurs to some extent in 19.0 per cent. of children, in the following proportions: Adenoids, 2.8 per cent.; enlarged tonsils, 13.4 per cent.; adenoids and enlarged tonsils, 2.8 per cent. Many of these cases show obstructed breathing to slight degree, and, by well-regulated breathing-exercises and physical drill, improve without operation. (Extract from Report, 1921, of the Director, Division of School Hygiene.)

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

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