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The annual meeting of the New Zealand Branch of the British Medical Association was held in Auckland on February 28th, 1911, and following days. All who attended say that the meeting was an unqualified success, and though there were not quite so many visitors from the south as were expected, the meetings were well attended, and the papers, several of which are published in this issue of the JOURNAL, were of more than usual interest. We print an appreciation by a country doctor, which gives a fair idea of the importance and usefulness of these annual meetings.Impressions of the Annual Meeting[By \"MEDICO.\"]Those of us who were fortunate enough to attend the Annual Meeting held this year in Auckland have new memories of a profitable and pleasant time, and a happy combination of business and pleasure.The Auckland doctors and their charming wives seemed to do all in their power to give the visiting members and their wives a bully time, to use an American expression. Who will forget the dinner and the amusing \"tom-cat incident.\" Then it was pleasant to see medical men renewing old acquaintances and friendships—also making new friendships. You would see two medical men foregathering for the first time—perhaps they had heard of one another, but had never met before ; one had formed a mental picture of the other as being perhaps a tall, stout, elderly man, and lo, to his surprise, he finds the person in question is a thin, lean, shaven, youthful-looking individual of somewhat small stature.Then the business part of the proceedings were certainly very instructive. Some excellent papers were read, and the discussions were also very good. Now and again the seriousness of the discussions would be relieved by the \"fulminating\" Dr. C., the amusing part being that the more he fulminated, the less seriously were his remarks treated. Dr. Valintine was present at one or two of the meetings, and explained his views on the proposed Nursing Scheme, having trained nurses in the back-blocks. This should, I think, meet with our hearty approval. Then he mentioned the proposed Notification of Venereal Disease. This is a matter that wants very careful consideration.Dr. Valintine made a decided faux pax when he said that hospital abuse was a thing of the past. The remark made several of those present squirm, and one or two spoke very strongly on the subject,, and several more would have spoken on the same matter but for the consideration of Dr. Valintine's feelings. Hospital abuse is very prevalent, especially in the smaller townships, where all classes of people, rich and poor alike, go to the general hospital for operations, etc.Thus as I have said we had a pleasant and profitable time, and the week passed all too quickly.Some of us would have liked to have heard some discussion on the vexed Lodge Practice, but time did not permit. This is a matter that is of importance to the average general practitioner. Then another important matter affecting the welfare of the general practitioner in some smaller townships which there is a hospital, is the so-called Resident-Surgeon (with free house, etc., and salary) engaging in general practice. It is most unfair.I would like to see these three important matters brought up at every annual meeting of the British Medical Association in New Zealand, i.e., (I) hospital abuse; (II) lodge practice, and (III), resident surgeons engaging in private practice. These cannot be discussed too often.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Judy McKimm, Pro Dean, Health and Social Practice, Faculty of Social and Health Sciences, Unitec New Zealand; Dale Sheehan, Clinical Teaching Co-ordinator, Health Sciences, University of Canterbury and Medical Education Co-ordinator, Medical Education and Training Unit, Canterbury District Health Board, Christchurch; Phillippa Poole, Head, Medical Education Division, School of Medicine, University of Auckland; Mark Barrow, Associate Dean (Education), Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, University of Auckland; John Dockerty, Associate Dean (Undergraduate Education), Dunedin School of Medicine, Dunedin; Tim Wilkinson, Associate Dean (medical education), University of Otago, Christchurch; Andy Wearn, Director of Clinical Skills Resource Centre, University of Auckland

Acknowledgements

The authors thank the Medical Education Group of New Zealand (MEGNZ) review panel for their helpful feedback on earlier drafts of this article.

Correspondence

Judy McKimm, Pro Dean, Health and Social Practice, Faculty of Social and Health Sciences, Unitec New Zealand, Waitakere Campus, 5 Ratanui St, Henderson, Private Bag 92995, New Zealand. Fax: +64 (0)9 8154554

Correspondence Email

jmckimm@unitec.ac.nz

Competing Interests

None known

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

The annual meeting of the New Zealand Branch of the British Medical Association was held in Auckland on February 28th, 1911, and following days. All who attended say that the meeting was an unqualified success, and though there were not quite so many visitors from the south as were expected, the meetings were well attended, and the papers, several of which are published in this issue of the JOURNAL, were of more than usual interest. We print an appreciation by a country doctor, which gives a fair idea of the importance and usefulness of these annual meetings.Impressions of the Annual Meeting[By \"MEDICO.\"]Those of us who were fortunate enough to attend the Annual Meeting held this year in Auckland have new memories of a profitable and pleasant time, and a happy combination of business and pleasure.The Auckland doctors and their charming wives seemed to do all in their power to give the visiting members and their wives a bully time, to use an American expression. Who will forget the dinner and the amusing \"tom-cat incident.\" Then it was pleasant to see medical men renewing old acquaintances and friendships—also making new friendships. You would see two medical men foregathering for the first time—perhaps they had heard of one another, but had never met before ; one had formed a mental picture of the other as being perhaps a tall, stout, elderly man, and lo, to his surprise, he finds the person in question is a thin, lean, shaven, youthful-looking individual of somewhat small stature.Then the business part of the proceedings were certainly very instructive. Some excellent papers were read, and the discussions were also very good. Now and again the seriousness of the discussions would be relieved by the \"fulminating\" Dr. C., the amusing part being that the more he fulminated, the less seriously were his remarks treated. Dr. Valintine was present at one or two of the meetings, and explained his views on the proposed Nursing Scheme, having trained nurses in the back-blocks. This should, I think, meet with our hearty approval. Then he mentioned the proposed Notification of Venereal Disease. This is a matter that wants very careful consideration.Dr. Valintine made a decided faux pax when he said that hospital abuse was a thing of the past. The remark made several of those present squirm, and one or two spoke very strongly on the subject,, and several more would have spoken on the same matter but for the consideration of Dr. Valintine's feelings. Hospital abuse is very prevalent, especially in the smaller townships, where all classes of people, rich and poor alike, go to the general hospital for operations, etc.Thus as I have said we had a pleasant and profitable time, and the week passed all too quickly.Some of us would have liked to have heard some discussion on the vexed Lodge Practice, but time did not permit. This is a matter that is of importance to the average general practitioner. Then another important matter affecting the welfare of the general practitioner in some smaller townships which there is a hospital, is the so-called Resident-Surgeon (with free house, etc., and salary) engaging in general practice. It is most unfair.I would like to see these three important matters brought up at every annual meeting of the British Medical Association in New Zealand, i.e., (I) hospital abuse; (II) lodge practice, and (III), resident surgeons engaging in private practice. These cannot be discussed too often.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Judy McKimm, Pro Dean, Health and Social Practice, Faculty of Social and Health Sciences, Unitec New Zealand; Dale Sheehan, Clinical Teaching Co-ordinator, Health Sciences, University of Canterbury and Medical Education Co-ordinator, Medical Education and Training Unit, Canterbury District Health Board, Christchurch; Phillippa Poole, Head, Medical Education Division, School of Medicine, University of Auckland; Mark Barrow, Associate Dean (Education), Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, University of Auckland; John Dockerty, Associate Dean (Undergraduate Education), Dunedin School of Medicine, Dunedin; Tim Wilkinson, Associate Dean (medical education), University of Otago, Christchurch; Andy Wearn, Director of Clinical Skills Resource Centre, University of Auckland

Acknowledgements

The authors thank the Medical Education Group of New Zealand (MEGNZ) review panel for their helpful feedback on earlier drafts of this article.

Correspondence

Judy McKimm, Pro Dean, Health and Social Practice, Faculty of Social and Health Sciences, Unitec New Zealand, Waitakere Campus, 5 Ratanui St, Henderson, Private Bag 92995, New Zealand. Fax: +64 (0)9 8154554

Correspondence Email

jmckimm@unitec.ac.nz

Competing Interests

None known

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

The annual meeting of the New Zealand Branch of the British Medical Association was held in Auckland on February 28th, 1911, and following days. All who attended say that the meeting was an unqualified success, and though there were not quite so many visitors from the south as were expected, the meetings were well attended, and the papers, several of which are published in this issue of the JOURNAL, were of more than usual interest. We print an appreciation by a country doctor, which gives a fair idea of the importance and usefulness of these annual meetings.Impressions of the Annual Meeting[By \"MEDICO.\"]Those of us who were fortunate enough to attend the Annual Meeting held this year in Auckland have new memories of a profitable and pleasant time, and a happy combination of business and pleasure.The Auckland doctors and their charming wives seemed to do all in their power to give the visiting members and their wives a bully time, to use an American expression. Who will forget the dinner and the amusing \"tom-cat incident.\" Then it was pleasant to see medical men renewing old acquaintances and friendships—also making new friendships. You would see two medical men foregathering for the first time—perhaps they had heard of one another, but had never met before ; one had formed a mental picture of the other as being perhaps a tall, stout, elderly man, and lo, to his surprise, he finds the person in question is a thin, lean, shaven, youthful-looking individual of somewhat small stature.Then the business part of the proceedings were certainly very instructive. Some excellent papers were read, and the discussions were also very good. Now and again the seriousness of the discussions would be relieved by the \"fulminating\" Dr. C., the amusing part being that the more he fulminated, the less seriously were his remarks treated. Dr. Valintine was present at one or two of the meetings, and explained his views on the proposed Nursing Scheme, having trained nurses in the back-blocks. This should, I think, meet with our hearty approval. Then he mentioned the proposed Notification of Venereal Disease. This is a matter that wants very careful consideration.Dr. Valintine made a decided faux pax when he said that hospital abuse was a thing of the past. The remark made several of those present squirm, and one or two spoke very strongly on the subject,, and several more would have spoken on the same matter but for the consideration of Dr. Valintine's feelings. Hospital abuse is very prevalent, especially in the smaller townships, where all classes of people, rich and poor alike, go to the general hospital for operations, etc.Thus as I have said we had a pleasant and profitable time, and the week passed all too quickly.Some of us would have liked to have heard some discussion on the vexed Lodge Practice, but time did not permit. This is a matter that is of importance to the average general practitioner. Then another important matter affecting the welfare of the general practitioner in some smaller townships which there is a hospital, is the so-called Resident-Surgeon (with free house, etc., and salary) engaging in general practice. It is most unfair.I would like to see these three important matters brought up at every annual meeting of the British Medical Association in New Zealand, i.e., (I) hospital abuse; (II) lodge practice, and (III), resident surgeons engaging in private practice. These cannot be discussed too often.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Judy McKimm, Pro Dean, Health and Social Practice, Faculty of Social and Health Sciences, Unitec New Zealand; Dale Sheehan, Clinical Teaching Co-ordinator, Health Sciences, University of Canterbury and Medical Education Co-ordinator, Medical Education and Training Unit, Canterbury District Health Board, Christchurch; Phillippa Poole, Head, Medical Education Division, School of Medicine, University of Auckland; Mark Barrow, Associate Dean (Education), Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, University of Auckland; John Dockerty, Associate Dean (Undergraduate Education), Dunedin School of Medicine, Dunedin; Tim Wilkinson, Associate Dean (medical education), University of Otago, Christchurch; Andy Wearn, Director of Clinical Skills Resource Centre, University of Auckland

Acknowledgements

The authors thank the Medical Education Group of New Zealand (MEGNZ) review panel for their helpful feedback on earlier drafts of this article.

Correspondence

Judy McKimm, Pro Dean, Health and Social Practice, Faculty of Social and Health Sciences, Unitec New Zealand, Waitakere Campus, 5 Ratanui St, Henderson, Private Bag 92995, New Zealand. Fax: +64 (0)9 8154554

Correspondence Email

jmckimm@unitec.ac.nz

Competing Interests

None known

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

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