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Excerpt published in NZMJ 1913 Dec;12(48):599– and written by P. Clennell Fenwick, M.D., N.Z.; M.B. , Lond.; F.R.C.S.E., Christchurch

(Continued from part 2 at http://journal.nzma.org.nz/journal/126-1382/5838)

Dr. Alfred Haviland, in this article on Medical Geography, points out that in England cancer is most prevalent along the lower courses of rivers and least frequent on high ground. This substantiates Dr. Hislop's remarks on the locality of the patients' residences.

Soon after the publication of Dr. Hislop's paper, Dr. Alexander Haig wrote to the Journal calling attention to this report. He said: \"With such a large introduction of purins in meat and tea, it is small wonder that rheumatism is universal, and since the men introduce more than the women, and are, moreover, somewhat more exposed to damp, it is not extraordinary that the incidence of cancer is increasing most with men.\"

In a letter he shows that cancer is most prevalent in the richer quarters of London; thus in St. George's, Hanover Square, the richest parish in England, cancer accounts for one death in eight. In Bethnal Green the proportion is one case in twenty. He ascribes this to the purchasing power of the wealthy, who spend their money on meat, while this luxury is impossible to the poorer classes.

In this country the consumption of meat is very large, and the amount of tea, which is drunk, very often with meat meals, is extraordinary. In support of the suggestion that certain diets are often a factor in the origin of cancer, I would like to quote a very interesting article by Dr. Renner on the spread of cancer among the creoles in Sierra Leone, which appeared in the British Medical Journal in September, 1910. He states that cancer is increasing among the creoles but is rare among the aboriginal tribes of that colony.

He says that the creoles consume a large quantity of meat, which is quite unnecessary in the climate, while the aborigines confine themselves to a grain and vegetable diet, and eat very little flesh, and he points out that the creoles can afford to buy European food and the aboriginals cannot. He also mentions that epithelioma of the lips, tongue and cheek is rare among both creoles and aboriginals, and says that the creoles are not great smokers of clay pipes and have good teeth.

Although the aboriginals of all ages are great smokers of clay pipes their teeth are kept beautifully. He notes a distinct degeneration of the teeth among the creole children, but says that this is not noticeable among the aboriginal children, and ascribes this to the fact that the creole children use European articles of food-sweets, preserves, etc. a diet which is not within the reach of the aboriginal children.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

Excerpt published in NZMJ 1913 Dec;12(48):599– and written by P. Clennell Fenwick, M.D., N.Z.; M.B. , Lond.; F.R.C.S.E., Christchurch

(Continued from part 2 at http://journal.nzma.org.nz/journal/126-1382/5838)

Dr. Alfred Haviland, in this article on Medical Geography, points out that in England cancer is most prevalent along the lower courses of rivers and least frequent on high ground. This substantiates Dr. Hislop's remarks on the locality of the patients' residences.

Soon after the publication of Dr. Hislop's paper, Dr. Alexander Haig wrote to the Journal calling attention to this report. He said: \"With such a large introduction of purins in meat and tea, it is small wonder that rheumatism is universal, and since the men introduce more than the women, and are, moreover, somewhat more exposed to damp, it is not extraordinary that the incidence of cancer is increasing most with men.\"

In a letter he shows that cancer is most prevalent in the richer quarters of London; thus in St. George's, Hanover Square, the richest parish in England, cancer accounts for one death in eight. In Bethnal Green the proportion is one case in twenty. He ascribes this to the purchasing power of the wealthy, who spend their money on meat, while this luxury is impossible to the poorer classes.

In this country the consumption of meat is very large, and the amount of tea, which is drunk, very often with meat meals, is extraordinary. In support of the suggestion that certain diets are often a factor in the origin of cancer, I would like to quote a very interesting article by Dr. Renner on the spread of cancer among the creoles in Sierra Leone, which appeared in the British Medical Journal in September, 1910. He states that cancer is increasing among the creoles but is rare among the aboriginal tribes of that colony.

He says that the creoles consume a large quantity of meat, which is quite unnecessary in the climate, while the aborigines confine themselves to a grain and vegetable diet, and eat very little flesh, and he points out that the creoles can afford to buy European food and the aboriginals cannot. He also mentions that epithelioma of the lips, tongue and cheek is rare among both creoles and aboriginals, and says that the creoles are not great smokers of clay pipes and have good teeth.

Although the aboriginals of all ages are great smokers of clay pipes their teeth are kept beautifully. He notes a distinct degeneration of the teeth among the creole children, but says that this is not noticeable among the aboriginal children, and ascribes this to the fact that the creole children use European articles of food-sweets, preserves, etc. a diet which is not within the reach of the aboriginal children.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

Excerpt published in NZMJ 1913 Dec;12(48):599– and written by P. Clennell Fenwick, M.D., N.Z.; M.B. , Lond.; F.R.C.S.E., Christchurch

(Continued from part 2 at http://journal.nzma.org.nz/journal/126-1382/5838)

Dr. Alfred Haviland, in this article on Medical Geography, points out that in England cancer is most prevalent along the lower courses of rivers and least frequent on high ground. This substantiates Dr. Hislop's remarks on the locality of the patients' residences.

Soon after the publication of Dr. Hislop's paper, Dr. Alexander Haig wrote to the Journal calling attention to this report. He said: \"With such a large introduction of purins in meat and tea, it is small wonder that rheumatism is universal, and since the men introduce more than the women, and are, moreover, somewhat more exposed to damp, it is not extraordinary that the incidence of cancer is increasing most with men.\"

In a letter he shows that cancer is most prevalent in the richer quarters of London; thus in St. George's, Hanover Square, the richest parish in England, cancer accounts for one death in eight. In Bethnal Green the proportion is one case in twenty. He ascribes this to the purchasing power of the wealthy, who spend their money on meat, while this luxury is impossible to the poorer classes.

In this country the consumption of meat is very large, and the amount of tea, which is drunk, very often with meat meals, is extraordinary. In support of the suggestion that certain diets are often a factor in the origin of cancer, I would like to quote a very interesting article by Dr. Renner on the spread of cancer among the creoles in Sierra Leone, which appeared in the British Medical Journal in September, 1910. He states that cancer is increasing among the creoles but is rare among the aboriginal tribes of that colony.

He says that the creoles consume a large quantity of meat, which is quite unnecessary in the climate, while the aborigines confine themselves to a grain and vegetable diet, and eat very little flesh, and he points out that the creoles can afford to buy European food and the aboriginals cannot. He also mentions that epithelioma of the lips, tongue and cheek is rare among both creoles and aboriginals, and says that the creoles are not great smokers of clay pipes and have good teeth.

Although the aboriginals of all ages are great smokers of clay pipes their teeth are kept beautifully. He notes a distinct degeneration of the teeth among the creole children, but says that this is not noticeable among the aboriginal children, and ascribes this to the fact that the creole children use European articles of food-sweets, preserves, etc. a diet which is not within the reach of the aboriginal children.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

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