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MB CHB FAFPHM DPH (11 September 1925 - 9 August 2010) Guy was born in Coventry, Warwickshire, England. His father and grandfather were both doctors and he followed in their medical careers. His initial education was at Ascham St Vincents, Eastbourne, and Malvern, near Oxford. Secondary schooling was at Christs College, Christchurch, New Zealand, as he, a brother and their mother were sent to safety away from the developing war in Europe. There he won a Boarding Bursary and a Ralph Barnett Scholarship, entering Otago Medical School in 1943. In addition to medical studies he was active in rowing, debating (leader of the 1944 winning faculty team), and President of the Otago University Union debating club. He edited cCriticd, the Student Association newspaper. Drama was another interest and he was a member of Ngaio Marshs touring drama group. There he was paid for the parts played, minor though they were. He also joined the Otago Dramatic Society where he met his wife, Suzette Ann (Toni) Bilton. They married in 1947. Toni died in 2008 and he is survived by his daughter Therese, and sons Bilton and Guy. Guys early career began in Samoa in 1950 where his intense interest in the Pacific Islands and Public Health started and diverted him from the intended return to England. He joined the Colonial Service in Fiji in 1953, spent some months in Tonga and then went to the UK studying for the Diploma in Public Health, 1956-57. He returned to Fiji, worked as Medical Officer in Suva, Lautoka, Labasa and Sigatoka. He was tutor in charge of Social & Preventive Medicine Fiji School of Medicine, Senior Tutor, then Principal of the School, 1969-1974. The Fiji School of Medicine was the central medical school for all the English-speaking Pacific nations and also offered refresher courses to their medical staff; for example, those working in the field of leprosy. In 1974 he was appointed Deputy Superintendent in Chief of the Auckland Hospital Board (later Auckland Area Health Board) where his special interest in Public Health, the health of Pacific peoples in Auckland, and community health developed further. As part of his duties he was appointed Medical Superintendent of the Wilson Home, Takapuna, where children with long-term physical disabilities received the best treatment possible, while having their educational needs met. He retained this position until his retirement. Guy was committed to ensuring the links between hospital treatment, rehabilitation and home care were provided effectively. The then Extramural Hospital with its four bases in Greater Auckland, led by a medical practitioner, provided the District Nursing Service and allied health professionals (social workers, physiotherapists, occupational and speech language therapists) which complemented the in hospital services. He also had responsibility for chairing the Health of Older People Advisory Committee. Under his guidance representatives from the religious and welfare and private sectors met to plan services and set standards for the care of older people in residential care. His vision for the improvement of residential care services for older people led to the establishment of a team of social workers who developed a register of all such homes that were then monitored. This was a very useful accommodation register providing individuals and families with essential information as they made their choice. His last appointment, 1988, was as Chief Medical Officer of the Auckland Area Health Board, prior to retirement in 1990. Despite his increasing deafness Guy continued to maintain his interest and enjoyment in bridge, reading and philately, all interests maintained from his student years. Guy had a deep and wide knowledge of the medical fields he studied and worked in. A quiet, modest, compassionate man he contributed much to the understanding and treatment of the diseases and illnesses of the Pacific region and then assisted in the delivery of health services to the people of Greater Auckland. He will be remembered for his intellect, humour and wisdom.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

MB CHB FAFPHM DPH (11 September 1925 - 9 August 2010) Guy was born in Coventry, Warwickshire, England. His father and grandfather were both doctors and he followed in their medical careers. His initial education was at Ascham St Vincents, Eastbourne, and Malvern, near Oxford. Secondary schooling was at Christs College, Christchurch, New Zealand, as he, a brother and their mother were sent to safety away from the developing war in Europe. There he won a Boarding Bursary and a Ralph Barnett Scholarship, entering Otago Medical School in 1943. In addition to medical studies he was active in rowing, debating (leader of the 1944 winning faculty team), and President of the Otago University Union debating club. He edited cCriticd, the Student Association newspaper. Drama was another interest and he was a member of Ngaio Marshs touring drama group. There he was paid for the parts played, minor though they were. He also joined the Otago Dramatic Society where he met his wife, Suzette Ann (Toni) Bilton. They married in 1947. Toni died in 2008 and he is survived by his daughter Therese, and sons Bilton and Guy. Guys early career began in Samoa in 1950 where his intense interest in the Pacific Islands and Public Health started and diverted him from the intended return to England. He joined the Colonial Service in Fiji in 1953, spent some months in Tonga and then went to the UK studying for the Diploma in Public Health, 1956-57. He returned to Fiji, worked as Medical Officer in Suva, Lautoka, Labasa and Sigatoka. He was tutor in charge of Social & Preventive Medicine Fiji School of Medicine, Senior Tutor, then Principal of the School, 1969-1974. The Fiji School of Medicine was the central medical school for all the English-speaking Pacific nations and also offered refresher courses to their medical staff; for example, those working in the field of leprosy. In 1974 he was appointed Deputy Superintendent in Chief of the Auckland Hospital Board (later Auckland Area Health Board) where his special interest in Public Health, the health of Pacific peoples in Auckland, and community health developed further. As part of his duties he was appointed Medical Superintendent of the Wilson Home, Takapuna, where children with long-term physical disabilities received the best treatment possible, while having their educational needs met. He retained this position until his retirement. Guy was committed to ensuring the links between hospital treatment, rehabilitation and home care were provided effectively. The then Extramural Hospital with its four bases in Greater Auckland, led by a medical practitioner, provided the District Nursing Service and allied health professionals (social workers, physiotherapists, occupational and speech language therapists) which complemented the in hospital services. He also had responsibility for chairing the Health of Older People Advisory Committee. Under his guidance representatives from the religious and welfare and private sectors met to plan services and set standards for the care of older people in residential care. His vision for the improvement of residential care services for older people led to the establishment of a team of social workers who developed a register of all such homes that were then monitored. This was a very useful accommodation register providing individuals and families with essential information as they made their choice. His last appointment, 1988, was as Chief Medical Officer of the Auckland Area Health Board, prior to retirement in 1990. Despite his increasing deafness Guy continued to maintain his interest and enjoyment in bridge, reading and philately, all interests maintained from his student years. Guy had a deep and wide knowledge of the medical fields he studied and worked in. A quiet, modest, compassionate man he contributed much to the understanding and treatment of the diseases and illnesses of the Pacific region and then assisted in the delivery of health services to the people of Greater Auckland. He will be remembered for his intellect, humour and wisdom.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

MB CHB FAFPHM DPH (11 September 1925 - 9 August 2010) Guy was born in Coventry, Warwickshire, England. His father and grandfather were both doctors and he followed in their medical careers. His initial education was at Ascham St Vincents, Eastbourne, and Malvern, near Oxford. Secondary schooling was at Christs College, Christchurch, New Zealand, as he, a brother and their mother were sent to safety away from the developing war in Europe. There he won a Boarding Bursary and a Ralph Barnett Scholarship, entering Otago Medical School in 1943. In addition to medical studies he was active in rowing, debating (leader of the 1944 winning faculty team), and President of the Otago University Union debating club. He edited cCriticd, the Student Association newspaper. Drama was another interest and he was a member of Ngaio Marshs touring drama group. There he was paid for the parts played, minor though they were. He also joined the Otago Dramatic Society where he met his wife, Suzette Ann (Toni) Bilton. They married in 1947. Toni died in 2008 and he is survived by his daughter Therese, and sons Bilton and Guy. Guys early career began in Samoa in 1950 where his intense interest in the Pacific Islands and Public Health started and diverted him from the intended return to England. He joined the Colonial Service in Fiji in 1953, spent some months in Tonga and then went to the UK studying for the Diploma in Public Health, 1956-57. He returned to Fiji, worked as Medical Officer in Suva, Lautoka, Labasa and Sigatoka. He was tutor in charge of Social & Preventive Medicine Fiji School of Medicine, Senior Tutor, then Principal of the School, 1969-1974. The Fiji School of Medicine was the central medical school for all the English-speaking Pacific nations and also offered refresher courses to their medical staff; for example, those working in the field of leprosy. In 1974 he was appointed Deputy Superintendent in Chief of the Auckland Hospital Board (later Auckland Area Health Board) where his special interest in Public Health, the health of Pacific peoples in Auckland, and community health developed further. As part of his duties he was appointed Medical Superintendent of the Wilson Home, Takapuna, where children with long-term physical disabilities received the best treatment possible, while having their educational needs met. He retained this position until his retirement. Guy was committed to ensuring the links between hospital treatment, rehabilitation and home care were provided effectively. The then Extramural Hospital with its four bases in Greater Auckland, led by a medical practitioner, provided the District Nursing Service and allied health professionals (social workers, physiotherapists, occupational and speech language therapists) which complemented the in hospital services. He also had responsibility for chairing the Health of Older People Advisory Committee. Under his guidance representatives from the religious and welfare and private sectors met to plan services and set standards for the care of older people in residential care. His vision for the improvement of residential care services for older people led to the establishment of a team of social workers who developed a register of all such homes that were then monitored. This was a very useful accommodation register providing individuals and families with essential information as they made their choice. His last appointment, 1988, was as Chief Medical Officer of the Auckland Area Health Board, prior to retirement in 1990. Despite his increasing deafness Guy continued to maintain his interest and enjoyment in bridge, reading and philately, all interests maintained from his student years. Guy had a deep and wide knowledge of the medical fields he studied and worked in. A quiet, modest, compassionate man he contributed much to the understanding and treatment of the diseases and illnesses of the Pacific region and then assisted in the delivery of health services to the people of Greater Auckland. He will be remembered for his intellect, humour and wisdom.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

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