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21 January 1920 - 7 October 2010 Born at Bruntwood, Cambridge to dairy farming parents, Wilfrid started school at the age of 6 riding a horse without saddle, 3 00bd miles to school at Hautapu. His secondary schooling was at Hamilton High School, travelling by train. This was until 1934, but in 1937 the family moved into Hamilton township. Earlier, from the country, in order to take part in rugby practice he took his bicycle on the train, to school, and later cycled home, some 20 kilometres. Wilfrid passed the matriculation examination, including Medical Preliminary, in 1936. In 1937 he was appointed prefect, and played for the First XV, and the next year was captain of the First XV, and the boy Head Prefectit was a co-educational school in those days. In 1939 he went to Auckland University and passed Medical Intermediate, giving him entry to the Medical School in 1940, at Otago University. With World War 2 on, Wilfrid and I, in our cholidaysd, biked to and from the freezing works, working in the fellmongery at Horotiu. Wilfrid was trimming fleeces and I was throwing them up onto a belt where a cpaintd was put on the skins overnight, and next day, upstairs, the fleece was just pushed off the skin. If it was getting a bit boring, one of us would call out cCome on Happy give us a songd. The response being the singers wonderful bass voice, on cOl Man Riverd, or the like. That was cHappy Davidsond who was later to be known as the extremely successful Inia Te Wiata. Wilfrid graduated MbChB (NZ) in 1944, having worked as an acting house-surgeon at Waikato Hospital for nearly all of that year, and continued his training until early 1947 when he went out into general practice in Hamilton, but continued at the Waikato Hospital, as a visiting anaesthetist. The author of this obituary joined him in medical practice, and also became a visiting anaesthetist. We both used machines for anaesthesia with intubation and curarization. All earlier inhalation anaesthesia had been with chloroform and/or ether. I, later, also went to Britain, and trained as a physician. In 1947 Wilfrid married Mary Jackson Dunbar of Wanganui, but now a registered nurse at Waikato Hospital. Mary was a wonderful wife and mother, and in 1951 they, and two young children, proceeded overseas to England, and in 1952 Wilfrid passed the Diploma of Anaesthesia. He then went to Edinburgh and Oxford in 1953, and was elected to the Fellowship of the Faculty of Anaesthetists of the Royal College of Surgeons , and later to the Fellowship of the Faculty of Anaesthetists of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons. During our years as House Surgeons at Waikato Hospital, Wilfrid and I saw a need for us to do general practice for several years before specializing, and neither of us has regretted doing that, as we were extremely busy in doing maternity as well as being visiting anaesthetists, in public and private. On returning to New Zealand in 1953 Wilfrid resumed general practice and continued to be very busy both in public and in private as an anaesthetist. He had elected to stay in only part-time hospital practice at a time when senior posts were being much sought after in the larger hospitals, however in 1962 Wilfrid joined the full-time staff at Waikato Hospital, where his services were even more sought after and his technical skills, work ethic, and compassion were more and more evident. Then in 1970 Wilfrid was appointed to Tauranga Hospital as Director of Anaesthesia. This move was a very happy one for him, something he never regretted, although it resulted in his working very long hours and carrying a very heavy workload, both in the operating theatres, and in the Intensive Care Unit and in pain management. Top surgeons who worked with him there spoke of him as the right man in the right place at the right time. A leading surgeon, spoke of how Wilfrid led by precept and example, paving the way for a superb specialist and anaesthetic service. Wilfrids competence in intensive care was second to none as he showed how to appropriately care for the critically ill, often into the small hours. At Wilfrids funeral, Dr Barry Partridge, a now retired surgeon, spoke of cWilfrid as a role model, a mentor, and a friend. He had a deep faith that he expressed in the way that he practised anaesthesia for the benefit of all, beyond the call of duty. It is humanly impossible to audit and evaluate his contribution to us all, and to this community.d Wilfrid was in his element in Tauranga, with his meticulous attention to detail, extraordinary devotion to duty, a very deep feeling of responsibility, and all this, often at a time, when other doctors in the same situation, would have demanded much more time out. Wilfrid was always a keen gardener as was his wife, and they shared responsibilities in the flower garden, and Wilfrid always maintained an excellent vegetable garden. Family holidays were always very precious particularly with a caravan and with relatives and friends. Throughout those busy years in Hamilton and Tauranga, he did his share of Committee work, such as the New Zealand Medical Association, Waikato Division; Junior Naturalist Society, PTA Hamilton Boys High School, and Hamilton High School Old Boys Assn, at different stages being Chairman of the three latter groups. Wilfrid was also a member of the Board of Governors of the Hamilton High Schools. He was an Elder of St-Andrews Presbyterian Church in Hamilton, then the Session of St Colomba in Tauranga. An Uncle Wilfrid had been a missionary in the Sudan. The Christie part of Wilfrids name was his mothers maiden name, and Wilfrid, in later years, took a great deal of interest in family history and church history. Wilfrid was 9 years of age, when his sole surviving sibling, Ruth, was born, and he was always to be her big brother, as also for Gordon and Betty, who sadly died at relatively young ages. Gordon had been in our Practice, before training as an Ear Nose and Throat Specialist. Wilfrids wife Mary was a remarkable woman , both as wife and Mother to their four children, yet was able also to do much good work in the community, in the church, and in charitable activities, until serious illness rendered her less able, and terminal illness caused her death in 2007. Wilfrid's elder son John, is a GP, and the younger son, Ian, an architect, and the girls, Barbara married to a dairy farmer, and Anne is a tutor. There are seven surviving grandchildren, and four great grandchildren.. Wilfrid was himself by this time far from well, and those of us who attended his 90th birthday function early this year, knew that he was tired of life. There was a gradual decline over the next few months and his passing was peaceful. To me, Wilfrids life was one of service to the community, to medicine, and to his loved and loving family. He was an extraordinarily accomplished anaesthetist in whom his family can take great pride. Dr DJ (Jack) Gudex wrote this obituary.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

21 January 1920 - 7 October 2010 Born at Bruntwood, Cambridge to dairy farming parents, Wilfrid started school at the age of 6 riding a horse without saddle, 3 00bd miles to school at Hautapu. His secondary schooling was at Hamilton High School, travelling by train. This was until 1934, but in 1937 the family moved into Hamilton township. Earlier, from the country, in order to take part in rugby practice he took his bicycle on the train, to school, and later cycled home, some 20 kilometres. Wilfrid passed the matriculation examination, including Medical Preliminary, in 1936. In 1937 he was appointed prefect, and played for the First XV, and the next year was captain of the First XV, and the boy Head Prefectit was a co-educational school in those days. In 1939 he went to Auckland University and passed Medical Intermediate, giving him entry to the Medical School in 1940, at Otago University. With World War 2 on, Wilfrid and I, in our cholidaysd, biked to and from the freezing works, working in the fellmongery at Horotiu. Wilfrid was trimming fleeces and I was throwing them up onto a belt where a cpaintd was put on the skins overnight, and next day, upstairs, the fleece was just pushed off the skin. If it was getting a bit boring, one of us would call out cCome on Happy give us a songd. The response being the singers wonderful bass voice, on cOl Man Riverd, or the like. That was cHappy Davidsond who was later to be known as the extremely successful Inia Te Wiata. Wilfrid graduated MbChB (NZ) in 1944, having worked as an acting house-surgeon at Waikato Hospital for nearly all of that year, and continued his training until early 1947 when he went out into general practice in Hamilton, but continued at the Waikato Hospital, as a visiting anaesthetist. The author of this obituary joined him in medical practice, and also became a visiting anaesthetist. We both used machines for anaesthesia with intubation and curarization. All earlier inhalation anaesthesia had been with chloroform and/or ether. I, later, also went to Britain, and trained as a physician. In 1947 Wilfrid married Mary Jackson Dunbar of Wanganui, but now a registered nurse at Waikato Hospital. Mary was a wonderful wife and mother, and in 1951 they, and two young children, proceeded overseas to England, and in 1952 Wilfrid passed the Diploma of Anaesthesia. He then went to Edinburgh and Oxford in 1953, and was elected to the Fellowship of the Faculty of Anaesthetists of the Royal College of Surgeons , and later to the Fellowship of the Faculty of Anaesthetists of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons. During our years as House Surgeons at Waikato Hospital, Wilfrid and I saw a need for us to do general practice for several years before specializing, and neither of us has regretted doing that, as we were extremely busy in doing maternity as well as being visiting anaesthetists, in public and private. On returning to New Zealand in 1953 Wilfrid resumed general practice and continued to be very busy both in public and in private as an anaesthetist. He had elected to stay in only part-time hospital practice at a time when senior posts were being much sought after in the larger hospitals, however in 1962 Wilfrid joined the full-time staff at Waikato Hospital, where his services were even more sought after and his technical skills, work ethic, and compassion were more and more evident. Then in 1970 Wilfrid was appointed to Tauranga Hospital as Director of Anaesthesia. This move was a very happy one for him, something he never regretted, although it resulted in his working very long hours and carrying a very heavy workload, both in the operating theatres, and in the Intensive Care Unit and in pain management. Top surgeons who worked with him there spoke of him as the right man in the right place at the right time. A leading surgeon, spoke of how Wilfrid led by precept and example, paving the way for a superb specialist and anaesthetic service. Wilfrids competence in intensive care was second to none as he showed how to appropriately care for the critically ill, often into the small hours. At Wilfrids funeral, Dr Barry Partridge, a now retired surgeon, spoke of cWilfrid as a role model, a mentor, and a friend. He had a deep faith that he expressed in the way that he practised anaesthesia for the benefit of all, beyond the call of duty. It is humanly impossible to audit and evaluate his contribution to us all, and to this community.d Wilfrid was in his element in Tauranga, with his meticulous attention to detail, extraordinary devotion to duty, a very deep feeling of responsibility, and all this, often at a time, when other doctors in the same situation, would have demanded much more time out. Wilfrid was always a keen gardener as was his wife, and they shared responsibilities in the flower garden, and Wilfrid always maintained an excellent vegetable garden. Family holidays were always very precious particularly with a caravan and with relatives and friends. Throughout those busy years in Hamilton and Tauranga, he did his share of Committee work, such as the New Zealand Medical Association, Waikato Division; Junior Naturalist Society, PTA Hamilton Boys High School, and Hamilton High School Old Boys Assn, at different stages being Chairman of the three latter groups. Wilfrid was also a member of the Board of Governors of the Hamilton High Schools. He was an Elder of St-Andrews Presbyterian Church in Hamilton, then the Session of St Colomba in Tauranga. An Uncle Wilfrid had been a missionary in the Sudan. The Christie part of Wilfrids name was his mothers maiden name, and Wilfrid, in later years, took a great deal of interest in family history and church history. Wilfrid was 9 years of age, when his sole surviving sibling, Ruth, was born, and he was always to be her big brother, as also for Gordon and Betty, who sadly died at relatively young ages. Gordon had been in our Practice, before training as an Ear Nose and Throat Specialist. Wilfrids wife Mary was a remarkable woman , both as wife and Mother to their four children, yet was able also to do much good work in the community, in the church, and in charitable activities, until serious illness rendered her less able, and terminal illness caused her death in 2007. Wilfrid's elder son John, is a GP, and the younger son, Ian, an architect, and the girls, Barbara married to a dairy farmer, and Anne is a tutor. There are seven surviving grandchildren, and four great grandchildren.. Wilfrid was himself by this time far from well, and those of us who attended his 90th birthday function early this year, knew that he was tired of life. There was a gradual decline over the next few months and his passing was peaceful. To me, Wilfrids life was one of service to the community, to medicine, and to his loved and loving family. He was an extraordinarily accomplished anaesthetist in whom his family can take great pride. Dr DJ (Jack) Gudex wrote this obituary.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

21 January 1920 - 7 October 2010 Born at Bruntwood, Cambridge to dairy farming parents, Wilfrid started school at the age of 6 riding a horse without saddle, 3 00bd miles to school at Hautapu. His secondary schooling was at Hamilton High School, travelling by train. This was until 1934, but in 1937 the family moved into Hamilton township. Earlier, from the country, in order to take part in rugby practice he took his bicycle on the train, to school, and later cycled home, some 20 kilometres. Wilfrid passed the matriculation examination, including Medical Preliminary, in 1936. In 1937 he was appointed prefect, and played for the First XV, and the next year was captain of the First XV, and the boy Head Prefectit was a co-educational school in those days. In 1939 he went to Auckland University and passed Medical Intermediate, giving him entry to the Medical School in 1940, at Otago University. With World War 2 on, Wilfrid and I, in our cholidaysd, biked to and from the freezing works, working in the fellmongery at Horotiu. Wilfrid was trimming fleeces and I was throwing them up onto a belt where a cpaintd was put on the skins overnight, and next day, upstairs, the fleece was just pushed off the skin. If it was getting a bit boring, one of us would call out cCome on Happy give us a songd. The response being the singers wonderful bass voice, on cOl Man Riverd, or the like. That was cHappy Davidsond who was later to be known as the extremely successful Inia Te Wiata. Wilfrid graduated MbChB (NZ) in 1944, having worked as an acting house-surgeon at Waikato Hospital for nearly all of that year, and continued his training until early 1947 when he went out into general practice in Hamilton, but continued at the Waikato Hospital, as a visiting anaesthetist. The author of this obituary joined him in medical practice, and also became a visiting anaesthetist. We both used machines for anaesthesia with intubation and curarization. All earlier inhalation anaesthesia had been with chloroform and/or ether. I, later, also went to Britain, and trained as a physician. In 1947 Wilfrid married Mary Jackson Dunbar of Wanganui, but now a registered nurse at Waikato Hospital. Mary was a wonderful wife and mother, and in 1951 they, and two young children, proceeded overseas to England, and in 1952 Wilfrid passed the Diploma of Anaesthesia. He then went to Edinburgh and Oxford in 1953, and was elected to the Fellowship of the Faculty of Anaesthetists of the Royal College of Surgeons , and later to the Fellowship of the Faculty of Anaesthetists of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons. During our years as House Surgeons at Waikato Hospital, Wilfrid and I saw a need for us to do general practice for several years before specializing, and neither of us has regretted doing that, as we were extremely busy in doing maternity as well as being visiting anaesthetists, in public and private. On returning to New Zealand in 1953 Wilfrid resumed general practice and continued to be very busy both in public and in private as an anaesthetist. He had elected to stay in only part-time hospital practice at a time when senior posts were being much sought after in the larger hospitals, however in 1962 Wilfrid joined the full-time staff at Waikato Hospital, where his services were even more sought after and his technical skills, work ethic, and compassion were more and more evident. Then in 1970 Wilfrid was appointed to Tauranga Hospital as Director of Anaesthesia. This move was a very happy one for him, something he never regretted, although it resulted in his working very long hours and carrying a very heavy workload, both in the operating theatres, and in the Intensive Care Unit and in pain management. Top surgeons who worked with him there spoke of him as the right man in the right place at the right time. A leading surgeon, spoke of how Wilfrid led by precept and example, paving the way for a superb specialist and anaesthetic service. Wilfrids competence in intensive care was second to none as he showed how to appropriately care for the critically ill, often into the small hours. At Wilfrids funeral, Dr Barry Partridge, a now retired surgeon, spoke of cWilfrid as a role model, a mentor, and a friend. He had a deep faith that he expressed in the way that he practised anaesthesia for the benefit of all, beyond the call of duty. It is humanly impossible to audit and evaluate his contribution to us all, and to this community.d Wilfrid was in his element in Tauranga, with his meticulous attention to detail, extraordinary devotion to duty, a very deep feeling of responsibility, and all this, often at a time, when other doctors in the same situation, would have demanded much more time out. Wilfrid was always a keen gardener as was his wife, and they shared responsibilities in the flower garden, and Wilfrid always maintained an excellent vegetable garden. Family holidays were always very precious particularly with a caravan and with relatives and friends. Throughout those busy years in Hamilton and Tauranga, he did his share of Committee work, such as the New Zealand Medical Association, Waikato Division; Junior Naturalist Society, PTA Hamilton Boys High School, and Hamilton High School Old Boys Assn, at different stages being Chairman of the three latter groups. Wilfrid was also a member of the Board of Governors of the Hamilton High Schools. He was an Elder of St-Andrews Presbyterian Church in Hamilton, then the Session of St Colomba in Tauranga. An Uncle Wilfrid had been a missionary in the Sudan. The Christie part of Wilfrids name was his mothers maiden name, and Wilfrid, in later years, took a great deal of interest in family history and church history. Wilfrid was 9 years of age, when his sole surviving sibling, Ruth, was born, and he was always to be her big brother, as also for Gordon and Betty, who sadly died at relatively young ages. Gordon had been in our Practice, before training as an Ear Nose and Throat Specialist. Wilfrids wife Mary was a remarkable woman , both as wife and Mother to their four children, yet was able also to do much good work in the community, in the church, and in charitable activities, until serious illness rendered her less able, and terminal illness caused her death in 2007. Wilfrid's elder son John, is a GP, and the younger son, Ian, an architect, and the girls, Barbara married to a dairy farmer, and Anne is a tutor. There are seven surviving grandchildren, and four great grandchildren.. Wilfrid was himself by this time far from well, and those of us who attended his 90th birthday function early this year, knew that he was tired of life. There was a gradual decline over the next few months and his passing was peaceful. To me, Wilfrids life was one of service to the community, to medicine, and to his loved and loving family. He was an extraordinarily accomplished anaesthetist in whom his family can take great pride. Dr DJ (Jack) Gudex wrote this obituary.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

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