View Article PDF

Wilhelm Lubbe was born in South Africa in 1938. Always a high achiever, he gained the Alec Brook Bequest Scholarship from Grey High School, Port Elizabeth, for his 6 years of medical study at the University of Cape Town. There he was always amongst the top students, gaining the Abe Bailey Travelling Fellowship, and the much coveted Frank Forman Prize in Medicine in his final year in 1962.

Lubbe

He represented his University as an accomplished athlete.

After internships in medicine and surgery at Groote Schuur Hospital, he left for the USA where he was resident in Internal Medicine at the Jewish Hospital, Cincinnati, Ohio in 1964, and then Hermann Blumgart Fellow in Cardiology at Beth Israel Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, from 1965 to 1968.

In 1969 he returned to South Africa as a Registrar in Medicine and Cardiology, at Groote Schuur Hospital. That year he was awarded an MD degree for his thesis Actions of thyroid hormone on the myocardium. He gained his Fellowship of the College of Medicine of South Africa in 1971. He took over as Head of the Hypertension Clinic in 1971, and appointment as a Senior Lecturer and Consultant soon followed in 1972.

This was a heady time in Cardiology in Cape Town with much publicity from the pioneering work of the Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery teams in heart transplant and the speciality in general. It was about that time that Wilhelm started a most productive research association with Professor Lionel Opie, and by 1976 he was Associate Director of that world renowned Unit. He gained a Fellowship of the American College of Cardiology in 1978. By 1978 he had been promoted to Associate Professor and Principal Specialist.

However, these were stormy days in South Africa’s history. Typical of Wilhelm, he and his family took a stand against the injustices of apartheid. This led to unpleasant and distracting interactions with the authorities and, like many up-and-coming young people, they decided to leave the country. Fortunately for us, Wilhelm and his former wife, Elizabeth, and their young family chose New Zealand.

Wilhelm came to Auckland in 1978. He was appointed as Associate Professor in Medicine in the Department of Medicine, and worked as a Consultant Physician at Greenlane Hospital. In 1987 he was appointed as the inaugural National Heart Foundation Chair in Cardiovascular Studies. He continued his clinical and research work at the Greenlane site, later transferring to Auckland Hospital.

Wilhelm had an outstanding research career and was internationally recognised for his work on hypertension, mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmogenesis and medical disorders of pregnancy. He was a superb general physician and cardiologist, much loved by his patients, and an inspiring and committed clinical teacher. Although demanding high standards from them, he was a great mentor and champion for his students and junior staff.

Wilhelm retired from his University position in 1995, but continued to work as a General Physician at Auckland Hospital. With his wife, Julie, he bought a small farm near Warkworth, and in 1999 he retired completely from clinical practice to take up farming, bringing to it the enthusiasm and passion that he did to all aspects of his life.

He loved the countryside, the animals and the creative outlet of carpentry and, eschewing the Internet and email, he found a deep contentment that had previously eluded him.

He died as he would have chosen; suddenly, hard at work on the farm on a beautiful morning, after an enjoyable evening spent with family and friends. He is survived by his three children, Andre, Tom and Catherine, and his wife, Julie.

Gil Barbazet (University of Otago) and Tim Cundy (University of Auckland) wrote this obituary.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

Wilhelm Lubbe was born in South Africa in 1938. Always a high achiever, he gained the Alec Brook Bequest Scholarship from Grey High School, Port Elizabeth, for his 6 years of medical study at the University of Cape Town. There he was always amongst the top students, gaining the Abe Bailey Travelling Fellowship, and the much coveted Frank Forman Prize in Medicine in his final year in 1962.

Lubbe

He represented his University as an accomplished athlete.

After internships in medicine and surgery at Groote Schuur Hospital, he left for the USA where he was resident in Internal Medicine at the Jewish Hospital, Cincinnati, Ohio in 1964, and then Hermann Blumgart Fellow in Cardiology at Beth Israel Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, from 1965 to 1968.

In 1969 he returned to South Africa as a Registrar in Medicine and Cardiology, at Groote Schuur Hospital. That year he was awarded an MD degree for his thesis Actions of thyroid hormone on the myocardium. He gained his Fellowship of the College of Medicine of South Africa in 1971. He took over as Head of the Hypertension Clinic in 1971, and appointment as a Senior Lecturer and Consultant soon followed in 1972.

This was a heady time in Cardiology in Cape Town with much publicity from the pioneering work of the Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery teams in heart transplant and the speciality in general. It was about that time that Wilhelm started a most productive research association with Professor Lionel Opie, and by 1976 he was Associate Director of that world renowned Unit. He gained a Fellowship of the American College of Cardiology in 1978. By 1978 he had been promoted to Associate Professor and Principal Specialist.

However, these were stormy days in South Africa’s history. Typical of Wilhelm, he and his family took a stand against the injustices of apartheid. This led to unpleasant and distracting interactions with the authorities and, like many up-and-coming young people, they decided to leave the country. Fortunately for us, Wilhelm and his former wife, Elizabeth, and their young family chose New Zealand.

Wilhelm came to Auckland in 1978. He was appointed as Associate Professor in Medicine in the Department of Medicine, and worked as a Consultant Physician at Greenlane Hospital. In 1987 he was appointed as the inaugural National Heart Foundation Chair in Cardiovascular Studies. He continued his clinical and research work at the Greenlane site, later transferring to Auckland Hospital.

Wilhelm had an outstanding research career and was internationally recognised for his work on hypertension, mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmogenesis and medical disorders of pregnancy. He was a superb general physician and cardiologist, much loved by his patients, and an inspiring and committed clinical teacher. Although demanding high standards from them, he was a great mentor and champion for his students and junior staff.

Wilhelm retired from his University position in 1995, but continued to work as a General Physician at Auckland Hospital. With his wife, Julie, he bought a small farm near Warkworth, and in 1999 he retired completely from clinical practice to take up farming, bringing to it the enthusiasm and passion that he did to all aspects of his life.

He loved the countryside, the animals and the creative outlet of carpentry and, eschewing the Internet and email, he found a deep contentment that had previously eluded him.

He died as he would have chosen; suddenly, hard at work on the farm on a beautiful morning, after an enjoyable evening spent with family and friends. He is survived by his three children, Andre, Tom and Catherine, and his wife, Julie.

Gil Barbazet (University of Otago) and Tim Cundy (University of Auckland) wrote this obituary.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

For the PDF of this article,
contact nzmj@nzma.org.nz

View Article PDF

Wilhelm Lubbe was born in South Africa in 1938. Always a high achiever, he gained the Alec Brook Bequest Scholarship from Grey High School, Port Elizabeth, for his 6 years of medical study at the University of Cape Town. There he was always amongst the top students, gaining the Abe Bailey Travelling Fellowship, and the much coveted Frank Forman Prize in Medicine in his final year in 1962.

Lubbe

He represented his University as an accomplished athlete.

After internships in medicine and surgery at Groote Schuur Hospital, he left for the USA where he was resident in Internal Medicine at the Jewish Hospital, Cincinnati, Ohio in 1964, and then Hermann Blumgart Fellow in Cardiology at Beth Israel Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, from 1965 to 1968.

In 1969 he returned to South Africa as a Registrar in Medicine and Cardiology, at Groote Schuur Hospital. That year he was awarded an MD degree for his thesis Actions of thyroid hormone on the myocardium. He gained his Fellowship of the College of Medicine of South Africa in 1971. He took over as Head of the Hypertension Clinic in 1971, and appointment as a Senior Lecturer and Consultant soon followed in 1972.

This was a heady time in Cardiology in Cape Town with much publicity from the pioneering work of the Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery teams in heart transplant and the speciality in general. It was about that time that Wilhelm started a most productive research association with Professor Lionel Opie, and by 1976 he was Associate Director of that world renowned Unit. He gained a Fellowship of the American College of Cardiology in 1978. By 1978 he had been promoted to Associate Professor and Principal Specialist.

However, these were stormy days in South Africa’s history. Typical of Wilhelm, he and his family took a stand against the injustices of apartheid. This led to unpleasant and distracting interactions with the authorities and, like many up-and-coming young people, they decided to leave the country. Fortunately for us, Wilhelm and his former wife, Elizabeth, and their young family chose New Zealand.

Wilhelm came to Auckland in 1978. He was appointed as Associate Professor in Medicine in the Department of Medicine, and worked as a Consultant Physician at Greenlane Hospital. In 1987 he was appointed as the inaugural National Heart Foundation Chair in Cardiovascular Studies. He continued his clinical and research work at the Greenlane site, later transferring to Auckland Hospital.

Wilhelm had an outstanding research career and was internationally recognised for his work on hypertension, mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmogenesis and medical disorders of pregnancy. He was a superb general physician and cardiologist, much loved by his patients, and an inspiring and committed clinical teacher. Although demanding high standards from them, he was a great mentor and champion for his students and junior staff.

Wilhelm retired from his University position in 1995, but continued to work as a General Physician at Auckland Hospital. With his wife, Julie, he bought a small farm near Warkworth, and in 1999 he retired completely from clinical practice to take up farming, bringing to it the enthusiasm and passion that he did to all aspects of his life.

He loved the countryside, the animals and the creative outlet of carpentry and, eschewing the Internet and email, he found a deep contentment that had previously eluded him.

He died as he would have chosen; suddenly, hard at work on the farm on a beautiful morning, after an enjoyable evening spent with family and friends. He is survived by his three children, Andre, Tom and Catherine, and his wife, Julie.

Gil Barbazet (University of Otago) and Tim Cundy (University of Auckland) wrote this obituary.

Summary

Abstract

Aim

Method

Results

Conclusion

Author Information

Acknowledgements

Correspondence

Correspondence Email

Competing Interests

Contact diana@nzma.org.nz
for the PDF of this article

Subscriber Content

The full contents of this pages only available to subscribers.

LOGINSUBSCRIBE